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Colin Talbert

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The NABat sampling frame is a grid-based finite-area frame spanning Canada, the United States, and Mexico consisting of N total number of 10- by 10-km (100-km2) grid cell sample units for the continental United States, Canada, and Alaska and 5- by 5-km (25km2) for Hawaii and Puerto Rico. This grain size is biologically appropriate given the scale of movement of most bat species, which routinely travel many kilometers each night between roosts and foraging areas and along foraging routes. A Generalized Random-Tessellation Stratified (GRTS) Survey Design draw was added to the sample units from the raw sampling grids (https://doi.org/10.5066/P9M00P17). This sampling design produces an ordered list of units such that...
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The NABat sampling frame is a grid-based finite-area frame spanning Canada, the United States, and Mexico consisting of N total number of 10- by 10-km (100-km2) grid cell sample units. This grain size is biologically appropriate given the scale of movement of most bat species, which routinely travel many kilometers each night between roosts and foraging areas and along foraging routes. A draw of sample units from a finite sampling frame using the GRTS design produces an ordered list of units such that any ordered subset of that list is also randomized and spatially balanced. This vector dataset is the individual grid-based sampling grid for Continental United States at a 10x10km resolution.
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This sampling frame is a set of grid-based finite-area frames spanning Canada, the United States, and Mexico. The grid for the United States is broken into individual grids for the continental United States, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Alaska is combined with Canada into a single grid. Each country/state/territory extent consists of four nested sampling grids at 50x50km, 10x10km, 5x5km, and 1x1km resolutions. The original 10x10km continental United States grid was developed by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture for use in the interagency “Bat Grid” monitoring program in the Pacific Northwest and was expanded across Canada, the United States, and Mexico for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)....
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‚ÄčThe USGS Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) conducts research and develops technical applications to assist land habitats, and ecosystems. Although the majority of FORT’s activities are conducted within the 15-state Central Region of the USGS, many FORT projects are national or international in scope. FORT serves all Department of the Interior land management bureaus and other natural resource agencies. In addition, FORT scientists partner with DOI and other federal entities such as CDC, DOE, EPA, NASA, NIH, and USDA to share expertise and resources. FORT also partners with several universities and works cooperatively with states and nongovernmental organizations. Products and services include reports and publications,...
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