Skip to main content

Person

Laurel Larsen

The “Hydroecology of Flowing Waters” project was initiated in 1998 with the aim to improve understanding of how stream and river corridors function naturally in ways that produce valuable ecosystem services (e.g. flood attenuation, carbon and nutrient storage and contaminant removal, habitat value for fish and wildlife, recreation). The research is increasingly focused on how aquatic ecosystem services can be better protected in the face of degradation resulting from accelerating land use and climate change. Central to the research is the investigation of interactions between physical and biological processes, e.g. how land use change affects hydraulics and channel geomorphology in ways that produce cascading...
thumbnail
Ecosystems are changing worldwide and critical decisions that affect ecosystem health and sustainability are being made every day. As ecologists, we have a responsibility to ensure that these decisions are made with access to the best available science. However, to bring this idea into practice, ecology needs to make a substantial leap forward towards becoming a more predictive science. Furthermore, even for basic, conceptual questions there is a lot to be gained by addressing problems from a forecasting perspective, with more frequent data-model comparisons helping to highlight misunderstandings and reframe long-standing questions. Ecological forecasting is occurring across a wide range of ecological sub-disciplines,...
thumbnail
Models that predict the flow of rivers and streams are critically important for planning flood control, hydropower, and reservoir operations, as well as for management of fish and wildlife populations. As temperatures and precipitation regimes change globally, the need to improve and develop these models for a wider spatial coverage and higher spatial fidelity becomes more imperative. Currently, one of the biggest impediments to developing robust streamflow knowledge is incomplete understanding of the range of timescales over which water is stored (e.g., in snowpack, soils, and groundwater) in watersheds, as well as the processes and factors that control those storage timescales. This working group will address...
thumbnail
Data Release from the High-Flow Field Experiments to Inform Everglades Restoration: Experimental Data 2010 to 2018. Data were obtained from field sites located in the Everglades between two canals (L-67A and L-67C) from 2010 to 2018. During this time, five major controlled flow releases occurred by opening the culvert S152 on canal L-67A. Data consist of water velocity (continuous and discrete), water levels (continuous and discrete), suspended sediment concentration, load and flux (discrete), suspended phosphorus concentration, load and flux (discrete), grainsize distribution (continuous and discrete), biogeochemistry (discrete), water quality (continuous), temperature (continuous) and vegetation (discrete).
thumbnail
A fundamental environmental challenge facing humanity in the 21st century and beyond is predicting the impacts of global environmental change. This challenge is complicated by the fact that we live on a non-stationary, unreplicated planet that is rapidly moving outside the envelope of natural variability into an historical non-analog world. In other words, while the past helps inform us about how the world has worked, it may no longer be the relevant frame of reference for management, conservation, and sustainability. In this future world the two questions at the foundation of sustainability are “How are ecosystems and the services they provide going to change in the future?” and “How do human decisions affect this...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.