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Person

Matthew L Brooks

Supervisory Research Ecologist

Western Ecological Research Center

Email: mlbrooks@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 559-240-7622
Fax: 702-564-4600
ORCID: 0000-0002-3518-6787

Location
40298 Junction Dr
Suite A
Oakhurst , CA 93644
US

Supervisor: Diane R Elam
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This three-band, 30-m resolution raster contains sagebrush vegetation types, soil temperature/moisture regime classes, and large fire frequencies across greater sage-grouse population areas within the Columbia Basin sage-grouse management zone. Sagebrush vegetation types were defined by grouping together similar vegetation types from the LANDFIRE biophysical settings layer. Soil moisture and temperature regimes were from an USDA-NRCS analysis of soil types across the greater sage-grouse range. Fire frequencies were derived from fire severity rasters created by the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity program. The area of analysis included the greater sage-grouse populations areas within specific management zones....
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This three-band, 30-m resolution raster contains sagebrush vegetation types, soil temperature/moisture regime classes, and large fire frequencies across greater sage-grouse population areas within the Northern Great Basin sage-grouse management zone. Sagebrush vegetation types were defined by grouping together similar vegetation types from the LANDFIRE biophysical settings layer. Soil moisture and temperature regimes were from an USDA-NRCS analysis of soil types across the greater sage-grouse range. Fire frequencies were derived from fire severity rasters created by the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity program. The area of analysis included the greater sage-grouse populations areas within specific management zones....
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We assessed the impacts of co-occurring invasive plant species on fire regimes and postfire native communities in the Mojave Desert, western USA by analyzing the distribution and co-occurrence patterns of three invasive annual grasses known to alter fuel conditions and community structure: Red Brome (Bromus rubens), Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), and Mediterranean grass (Schismus spp.: Schismus arabicus and Schismus barbatus), and an invasive forb, red stemmed filaree (Erodium cicutarium) which can dominate postfire sites. The data provide the geographic location and abundance (percent cover) of the four invasive taxa throughout the Mojave Desert. We developed species distribution models (SDMs) for each of the...
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This publication presents data collected within meadows from samples used to assess meadow plant community responses to recreational pack stock as part of a USGS Natural Resources Preservation Project. High elevation meadows are a vital ecological component of mountain systems throughout western North America. They provide critical habitat for wildlife, supply key ecosystem services, and are favored destinations for people visiting the mountains. The biophysical characteristics of meadows are highly variable, especially related to hydrologic regimes and associated plant community types. In the semi-arid landscape of the Sierra, water availability operates at multiple scales strongly influencing meadow plant community...
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Indices of habitat suitability and animal abundance provide useful proxy-based measures adaptive management (Coates et al. 2015a). Doherty et al. (in review) derived a range-wide population index model for sage-grouse using such indices that incorporated sage-grouse habitat suitability generated from Random Forest models (Evans et al. 2011), and spatially explicit abundance measures based on fixed kernel density functions informed by distributions of lek locations (lek locations defined by Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, see Coates et al. 2015b). The kernels were generated using two bandwidth distances representing the majority of breeding habitat in relation to leks (6.4 km) and seasonal movements...
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