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Thomas E Burley

Physical Scientist

Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center

Email: teburley@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 210-414-9577
ORCID: 0000-0002-2235-8092

Supervisor: Jennifer T Wilson
This project aimed to advance the long-standing need for a more formalized approach to data management planning at the science center (program) level in USGS. The study used two different science centers as test cases. Improved planning for data management and data integration is identified in the Bureau science strategy goals (U.S. Geological Survey, 2007; Burkett and others, 2011) with the need for consistent and unified data management to allow for accessible and high confidence data and information from the USGS science community. Benefits Two data management models for other science centers to use Data management framework tested by use case scenario Deliverables A Science Center review on data management...
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In 2013, the first of several Regional Stream Quality Assessments (RSQA) was done in the Midwest United States. The Midwest Stream Quality Assessment (MSQA) was a collaborative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA), the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA). One of the objectives of the RSQA, and thus the MSQA, is to characterize the relationships between water-quality stressors and stream ecology and to determine the relative effects of these stressors on aquatic biota within the streams (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012). To meet this objective, a framework of fundamental...
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Temporal patterns in glyphosate and atrazine concentrations were measured weekly by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the 2013 growing season in 100 small streams in the Midwestern United States. Concentrations also were measured every 2 days at a subset of 8 of the sites, all located in Missouri. Glyphosate was detected more frequently in urban streams than in agricultural streams, and at concentrations similar to those in streams with high agricultural land use in the watershed. In contrast, atrazine was detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in agricultural streams than in urban streams. This data release provides watershed characteristics and 2013 glyphosate and atrazine compound concentrations...
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USGS data are one of the most valuable assets of the organization, and it is critical that we ensure our scientists and staff produce and manage data in such a way that at the completion of a project, the data continues to be accessible in useable formats, documented so it can be understood, and preserved properly for future uses. The goals of this project included: produce three online training modules that relay the importance of data management, best practices for planning, and guidance for preparing science data to share; target audiences of researchers, data managers, and the public; format the modules to consist of automated PowerPoint slides, voice-over narration, and video segments featuring scientists...
In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Project of the National Water Quality Program launched a new type of study: the Regional Stream Quality Assessments (RSQA). The goals of the RSQA are to characterize water-quality stressors—contaminants, nutrients, sediment, and habitat—and ecological conditions in streams at regional scales and to determine the effects of these stressors on aquatic organisms. The studies include intensive sampling of stressors at approximately 100 wadeable streams, toxicity testing, and ecological surveys of algae, invertebrates, and fish. Sampling is done during spring and summer targeting the period of highest agricultural and urban chemical...
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