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Organization

Washington Water Science Center

Washington Water Science Center
https://www.usgs.gov/centers/wa-water

Location
934 Broadway
Suite 300
Tacoma , WA 98402
USA
Parent Organization: Office of the Northwest - Pacific Islands Regional Director
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The Sauk River, a fedrally designated Wild and Scenic River, is one of the few large glacier-fed rivers in western Washington that is unconstrained by dams and drains a relatively pristine landscape which includes Glacier Peak, a glaciated stratovolcano. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a 5-year study (2012-2016 water years) of suspended-sediment and water temperature monitoring for the purpose of determining suspended-sediment loads and identifying sediment production regimes and associated seasonality of sediment transport. Monitoring occurred at three USGS streamgages on the Sauk River, including two long-term gages with more than 90 years of continuous record and a new gage installed for the purpose...
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Measures used to assess trends in the 10th, 50th, and 90th quantiles of annual peak streamflow from 1916-2015 at 2,683 U.S. Geological Survey stations and within 191 4-digit HUCs in the conterminous United States. Linear quantile regression was applied to the selected quantiles of log-transformed annual peak streamflow to represent trends for a range of flood frequencies from small, common floods to large, infrequent floods. Comparative trends in pairs of quantiles were characterized as coherent, convergent, or divergent by comparing the slopes of linear quantile regression equations.
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Physical and chemical changes affect the biota within urban streams at varying scales ranging from individual organisms to populations and communities creating complex interactions that present challenges for characterizing and monitoring the impact on species utilizing these freshwater habitats. Salmonids, specifically cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), extensively utilize small stream habitats influenced by a changing urban landscape. This study used a comprehensive fish health assessment concurrent with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Pacific Northwest Stream Quality Assessment in 2015 to quantifiy impacts from disease in juvenile coho and cutthroat salmon, impacts to...
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This release contains data collected to study the impacts of vegetation removal on the condition of Lake Ozette Sockeye spawning habitat. From October 2018 to May 2019, continuous sediment temperature and subsurface dissolved oxygen were collected at sites near Olsen's Beach on the eastern shore of Lake Ozette, WA. Data were collected from 3 sites; a spawning control (SC) where sockeye currently return to spawn; a vegetation control (VC) where nearshore vegetation inhibits the amount of sockeye spawning; and a vegetation treatment (TR) area where nearshore vegetation was manually removed to assess if habitat quality can be improved. In addition to the continuous data, particle size data from the nearshore were determined...
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This data release provides information on the chemistry and character of bed sediments accumulated in the 1.6-mile long impoundment behind Enloe Dam on the Similkameen River in Okanogan County, WA. Sediment samples were collected during four weeks in October – December 2019. The sampling locations were distributed among 10 transects that ranged from 0.1-0.2 miles apart along the length of the reservoir. Surficial grab samples of bed material were collected at 27 locations representing the left, right or center of the channel cross-section where sampling was possible using a Ponar sampler. Sediment cores were collected with a Vibracore at 12 locations at or near the surficial grab sample transects, and discrete sediment...
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