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Organization

Florida Geological Survey

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The Florida Geological Survey holds a collection of over 9000 lithologic descriptions of cores and cuttings from wells located throughout Florida. This includes legacy logs previously stored in a file format requiring a DOS program to decode. Paper copies of a majority of legacy lithologic logs are stored in 150 large, green loose-leaf binders collectively named “Greenbooks,” which also include original drillers’ logs. The legacy files represent 60% of the collection and are currently being prepared for import into the Florida Geological Survey database of borehole information. The remaining 40% of the collection exist in various formats. Many lithologic logs still remain only on paper and continue to be problematic...
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The Oil and Gas section of the Florida Geological Survey has a large collection of geological data. These are stored as one collection in file cabinets and are organized by the permit number assigned to the project to which they relate. There are a total of 54, four-drawer legal-sized file cabinets. The collection is basically comprised of: a) Permit application and compliance documents b) Well logs and well test data c) Inspection photographs d) Monthly production data e) Core and cutting samples. Three sections of the collection as defined by the collection categories are as follows: 1) Drill stem test - Currently required Form 9 submitted for every well drilled in which oil/gas was encountered and flow tested....
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The FGS receives 2, 3 and 4 inch bore hole core samples. The core can be spot cores - taken from specific intervals, or continuous core ¿ representing the entire length of a bore hole. Samples arrive in various containers, and many times must be reboxed for long term storage. The majority of our samples are stored in cardboard boxes, but we do have a small percentage of cores in wooden boxes and PVC. For our 2 and 3 inch cores we have boxes that hold 8-10 feet of sample, similar to traditional NQ core boxes. The boxes are made of cardboard and are assembled by folding and stapling the sides. The boxes are 25.5¿ x 13¿ x 2.5¿. Our 4 inch cores are also stored in cardboard boxes. These boxes hold 4 feet of sample and...
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This series consists of photographic prints and negatives taken by Florida Geological Survey photographers to document Florida geological and archeological sites. Images include fossil and mineral specimens, examples of stratigraphic layers and land formations, and mining sites and equipment. The physical collection of historical photos is housed in the FGS library, the prints are stored in archival envelops in a file cabinet. This collection has been digitized and is available via the web. The collection includes lantern slides, 35mm photographs and black and white negatives. The Florida Geological Survey has a second informal collection of digital images taken by staff geologists over the past 10 years, which...
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The geophysical log collection consists of the various logs run on scientific coreholes, water, injection, oil and gas, observation and monitor wells throughout the state. The collection represents approximately 5320 boreholes,some of which are also represented in the core and well cuttings sample collection. The physical geophysical log collection is currently stored in four file cabinets, organized by county. These paper logs are long, continuous, accordion sheets. Some of the logs are printed on delicate onion skin paper; many others are on thermal paper. Old thermal paper tends to turn black or lose contrast, and many of the documents in the collection are fading or faded. The logs include the following types:...
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