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James E Conrad

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This part of the data release is a spreadsheet including the name, location, and length of sediment cores collected in 2009 offshore from Palos Verdes, California. It is one of seven files included in this U.S. Geological Survey data release that include data from a set of sediment cores acquired from the continental slope, offshore Los Angeles and the Palos Verdes Peninsula, adjacent to the Palos Verdes Fault. Gravity cores were collected by the USGS in 2009 (cruise ID S-I2-09-SC; http://cmgds.marine.usgs.gov/fan_info.php?fan=SI209SC), and vibracores were collected with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute’s remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Doc Ricketts in 2010 (cruise ID W-1-10-SC; http://cmgds.marine.usgs.gov/fan_info.php?fan=W110SC)....
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High-resolution multichannel minisparker and chirp seismic-reflection data were collected in August of 2015 to explore marine geologic hazards of inland waterways of southeastern Alaska. Sub-bottom profiles were acquired in the inland waters between Glacier Bay and Juneau, including Cross Sound and Chatham Strait. High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles were acquired to assess evidence for active seabed faulting and submarine landslide hazards. The data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Alaskan Gyre. Chirp data were acquired using a tow-fish Edgetech 512 chirp subbottom profiler, and multichannel (mcs) minisparker data were acquired using a 500-Joule minisparker source and a 48-channel Geometrics...
Categories: Data; Tags: Geophysics
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected high-resolution multichannel sparker, minisparker and chirp seismic-reflection data in November 2014, from offshore Catalina and Santa Cruz basins. The survey was designed to image faults and folds associated with movement on the faults in offshore southern California, including the Catalina, Catalina Ridge, San Clemente, and San Diego Trough faults. Data were collected aboard the Scripps Institution of Oceanography R/V Robert Gordon Sproul. Subbottom acoustic penetration spans several hundred meters and is variable by location. This data release contains processed digital SEG-Y. The seismic-reflection profiles of bedrock, sediment deposits and tectonic structure provide...
Categories: Data, Data Release - Revised; Tags: Geophysics
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This data release contains 25 multichannel minisparker seismic reflection (MCS) profiles and 41 chirp sub-bottom profiles that were collected in February of 2016 from the Catalina Basin offshore southern California by the U.S. Geological Survey Pacific and Coastal Marine Science Center in cooperation with the University of Washington. Data were collected aboard the University of Washington’s R/V Thomas G. Thompson on USGS cruise 2016-616-FA. MCS profiles were collected to image the Catalina and San Clemente fault systems as well as the San Gabriel Canyon and Channel system.
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In February 2016 the University of Washington in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (USGS, PCMSC) collected multibeam bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data in and near the Catalina Basin, southern California aboard the University of Washington's Research Vessel Thomas G. Thompson. Data was collected using a Kongsberg EM300 multibeam echosounder hull-mounted to the 274-foot R/V Thomas G. Thompson. The USGS, PCMSC processed these data and produced a series of bathymetric surfaces and acoustic-backscatter images for scientific research purposes. This data release provides a 10-m resolution bathymetry surface and a 10-m resolution acoustic backscatter image. In...
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