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Person

Maria Deszcz-Pan

Emeritus

Geology, Geophysics, and Geochemistry Science Center

Email: maryla@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 303-236-1317
ORCID: 0000-0002-6298-5314

Location
DFC Bldg 20
Box 25046
Denver Federal Center
Denver , CO 80225-0046
US

Supervisor: Robert J Horton
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Hydrothermally altered rocks, particularly if water saturated, can weaken stratovolcanoes, thereby increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far-traveled, destructive debris flows, which are the largest volcanic hazards for Mount Adams and Mount Baker. Evaluating the hazards associated with such alteration is difficult because much of the alteration is obscured by ice and its depth extent is unknown. Intense hydrothermal alteration significantly reduces the resistivity and magnetization of volcanic rock and therefore hydrothermally altered rocks are identified with helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic measurements at Mount Baker and Mount Adams. High resolution magnetic and electromagnetic...
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Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) and magnetic survey data along four flight lines were collected in Everglades National Park, Florida as part of a larger survey. Data were collected during October 2001. These lines, totaling 95.2 line-kilometers, repeated the path of four lines from earlier AEM survey collected in December 1994 (released under USGS Open-File Report 02-101 downloadable at https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr02101). Electromagnetic data were acquired with Dighem VRES frequency-domain system. Magnetic data were collected with a Scintrex CS2 cesium-vapor magnetometer. The nominal elevation of the electromagnetic system was 30 m. This data release includes raw and processed AEM data. This release also...
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Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) and magnetic survey data, a total of 3065 line-kilometers, were collected during October 2001 in two survey blocks and four repeated lines from an earlier survey. The largest area, Block 1 totaling 2692.2 line-kilometers was flown over Big Cypress Preserve, smaller Block 2 along 277.1 line-kilometers was flown near the town of Homestead, and four lines totaling 95.2 line-kilometers were flown over Everglades National Park. The lines over Everglades National Park repeated the path of four lines from an earlier AEM survey collected in December 1994 (released under USGS Open-File Report 02-101 downloadable at https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr02101). Electromagnetic data were acquired...
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Hydrothermally altered rocks, particularly if water saturated, can weaken stratovolcanoes, thereby increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far-traveled, destructive debris flows, which are the largest volcanic hazards for Mount Adams and Mount Baker. Evaluating the hazards associated with such alteration is difficult because much of the alteration is obscured by ice and its depth extent is unknown. Intense hydrothermal alteration significantly reduces the resistivity and magnetization of volcanic rock and therefore hydrothermally altered rocks are identified with helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic measurements at Mount Baker and Mount Adams. High resolution magnetic and electromagnetic...
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Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) and magnetic survey data were collected in Big Cypress National Preserve, Florida as part of a larger survey. Data were collected during October 2001. The Big Cypress National Preserve part was the largest of three segments, totaling 2692.2 line-kilometers. Electromagnetic data were acquired with Dighem VRES frequency-domain system. Magnetic data were collected with a Scintrex CS2 cesium-vapor magnetometer. The line spacing was 400 m and several tie lines were flown. The nominal elevation of electromagnetic system was 30 m. This data release includes raw and processed AEM data. This release also includes unprocessed and processed magnetic data that have been drift corrected.
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