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Person

Joseph D Ayotte

Supervisory Hydrologist

New England Water Science Center

Email: jayotte@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 603-226-7810
Fax: 603-226-7894
ORCID: 0000-0002-1892-2738

Location
331 Commerce Way
331 Commerce Way
Suite #2
Pembroke , NH 03275-3718
US

Supervisor: Paul M Barlow
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Arsenic concentrations from 20,450 domestic wells in the U.S. were used to develop a logistic regression model of the probability of having arsenic > 10 µg/L (“high arsenic”), which is presented at the county, state, and national scales. Variables representing geologic sources, geochemical, hydrologic, and physical features were among the significant predictors of high arsenic. For U.S. Census blocks, the mean probability of arsenic > 10 µg/L was multiplied by the population using domestic wells to estimate the potential high-arsenic domestic-well population. Approximately 44.1 M people in the U.S. use water from domestic wells. The population in the conterminous U.S. using water from domestic wells with predicted...
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Approximately 44.1 million people (about 14 percent of the U.S. population) rely on domestic wells as their source of drinking water. Unlike community water systems, which are regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act, there is no comprehensive national program for testing domestic well water to ensure that is it safe to drink. There are many activities, e.g., resource extraction, climate change-induced drought, and changes in land use patterns that could potentially affect the quality of the ground water source for domestic wells. The Health Studies Branch (HSB) of the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, created a Clean Water for Health Program to help address domestic...
Groundwater samples from public and private drinking water wells throughout the state of New Hampshire were analyzed for total Arsenic (As). Samples were collected after pH, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and water temperature had met stabilization criteria as outlined in the USGS National Field Manual (United States Geological Survey 2005). The As analyses were carried out in the geochemistry laboratory in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of New Hampshire (UNH). Not including replicate analysis, a total of 527 samples were analyzed via a hydride generator-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HG-ICP-MS) using a Cetac HGX-200 plumbed into a Nu Instruments Attom high-resolution...
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This data release contains a table of measured arsenic concentrations and associated model input variables used to test existing multivariate logistic regression models that predict the probabilities of arsenic concentrations exceeding threshold values of 1, 5, and 10 micrograms per liter in bedrock aquifers of New Hampshire. Location data are censored to the county level.
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Approximately 43 million people (about 14 percent of the U.S. population) rely on domestic wells as their source of drinking water. Unlike community water systems, which are regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act, there is no comprehensive national program to ensure that the water is tested to ensure that is it safe to drink. A study published in 2009 from the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey that assessed water-quality conditions from 2,100 domestic wells within 48 states reported that more than one in five (23 percent) of the sampled wells contained one or more contaminants at a concentration greater than a human-health benchmark. In addition, there are many activities,...
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