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Person

Gavin Hayes

Senior Science Advisor for Earthquakes & Geologic Hazardsic

Earthquake Hazards Program

Email: ghayes@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 303-273-8421
Fax: 303-273-8452
ORCID: 0000-0003-3323-0112

Location
1711 Illinois St
P.O. Box 25046
Mail Stop 966
Denver , CO 80225-0046
US

Supervisor: Michael M Grimm
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Subduction zones are home to the most seismically active faults on the planet. The shallow megathrust interface of subduction zones host our largest earthquakes, and are the only faults capable of M9+ ruptures. Despite these facts, our knowledge of subduction zone geometry - which likely plays a key role in determining the spatial extent and ultimately the size of subduction zone earthquakes - is incomplete. Here we calculate the three- dimensional geometries of all active global subduction zones. The resulting model - Slab2 - provides for the first time a comprehensive geometrical analysis of all known slabs in unprecedented detail.
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Subduction zones are home to the most seismically active faults on the planet. The shallow megathrust interface of subduction zones host our largest earthquakes, and are the only faults capable of M9+ ruptures. Despite these facts, our knowledge of subduction zone geometry - which likely plays a key role in determining the spatial extent and ultimately the size of subduction zone earthquakes - is incomplete. Here we calculate the three- dimensional geometries of all active global subduction zones. The resulting model - Slab2 - provides for the first time a comprehensive geometrical analysis of all known slabs in unprecedented detail. ##### This distribution includes models of three-dimensional slab geometry under...
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Subduction zones are home to the most seismically active faults on the planet. The shallow megathrust interface of subduction zones host our largest earthquakes, and are the only faults capable of M9+ ruptures. Despite these facts, our knowledge of subduction zone geometry - which likely plays a key role in determining the spatial extent and ultimately the size of subduction zone earthquakes - is incomplete. Here we calculate the three- dimensional geometries of all active global subduction zones. The resulting model - Slab2 - provides for the first time a comprehensive geometrical analysis of all known slabs in unprecedented detail.
thumbnail
Subduction zones are home to the most seismically active faults on the planet. The shallow megathrust interface of subduction zones host our largest earthquakes, and are the only faults capable of M9+ ruptures. Despite these facts, our knowledge of subduction zone geometry - which likely plays a key role in determining the spatial extent and ultimately the size of subduction zone earthquakes - is incomplete. Here we calculate the three- dimensional geometries of all active global subduction zones. The resulting model - Slab2 - provides for the first time a comprehensive geometrical analysis of all known slabs in unprecedented detail.
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