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Person

Robert G Schmitt

GEOGRAPHER

Geologic Hazards Science Center

Email: rschmitt@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 303-273-8583
Fax: 303-273-8452
ORCID: 0000-0001-8060-1954

Location
P.O. Box 25046
Mail Stop 966
Denver , CO 80225-0046
US

Supervisor: Lynda A Lastowka
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Here we present an inventory of remotely and field-observed landslides triggered by 2019-2020 Puerto Rico earthquake sequence. The inventory was mapped using pre- and post-event satellite imagery (PR_landslide_inventory_imagery.csv), an extensive collection of field observations (https://doi.org/10.5066/P96QNFMB) and using pre-earthquake lidar as guidance for mapping polygons with more precise locations and geometries (2015 - 2017 USGS Lidar DEM: Puerto Rico dataset). The inventory consists of a shapefile of 309 polygons (PR_landslide_inventory_pts.shp) outlining the source area and deposits together. It also includes a point inventory (PR_landslide_inventory_pts.shp) marking 170 individual displaced boulders that...
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Inventories of landslides and liquefaction triggered by major earthquakes are key research tools that can be used to develop and test hazard models. To eliminate redundant effort, we created a centralized and interactive repository of ground failure inventories that currently hosts 32 inventories generated by USGS and non-USGS authors and designed a pipeline for adding more as they become available. The repository consists of (1) a ScienceBase community page where the data are available for download and (2) an accompanying web application that allows users to browse and visualize the available datasets. We anticipate that easier access to these key datasets will accelerate progress in earthquake-triggered ground...
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Landslides are damaging and deadly, and they occur in every U.S. state. However, our current ability to understand landslide hazards at the national scale is limited, in part because spatial data on landslide occurrence across the U.S. varies greatly in quality, accessibility, and extent. Landslide inventories are typically collected and maintained by different agencies and institutions, usually within specific jurisdictional boundaries, and often with varied objectives and information attributes or even in disparate formats. The purpose of this data release is to provide an openly accessible, centralized map of existing information on landslide occurrence across the entire U.S. The data release includes digital...
Earthquake-triggered ground-failure, such as landsliding and liquefaction, can contribute significantly to losses, but our current ability to accurately include them in earthquake hazard analyses is limited. The development of robust and transportable models requires access to numerous inventories of ground failure triggered by earthquakes that span a broad range of terrains, shaking characteristics, and climates. We present an openly accessible, centralized earthquake-triggered ground-failure inventory repository in the form of a ScienceBase Community to provide open access to these data, and help accelerate progress. The Community hosts digital inventories created by both USGS and non-USGS authors. We present...
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Spatial data on landslide occurrence across the U.S. varies greatly in quality, accessibility, and extent. This problem of data variability is common across USGS Mission Areas; it presents an obstacle to developing national-scale products and to identifying areas with relatively good/bad data coverage. We compiled available data of known landslides into a national-scale, searchable online map, which greatly increases public access to landslide hazard information. Additionally, we held a workshop with landslide practitioners and sought broader input from the CDI community; based on recommendations we identified a limited subset of essential attributes for inclusion in our product. We also defined a quantitative metric...
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