Skip to main content

Person

Carolyn E Parcheta

thumbnail
During 2018, Kīlauea Volcano, on the Island of Hawaiʻi, had a large effusive eruption (~1 cubic kilometer of lava) on the lower East Rift Zone that caused widespread destruction (Neal and others, 2019; Dietterich and others, 2021). This lower flank eruption was accompanied by one of the largest collapses of the summit caldera in two hundred years, with portions of the caldera floor subsiding more than 500 m (Anderson and others, 2019; Neal and others, 2019). On July 25, 2019, approximately one year after the summit collapse sequence, a small pond of water was first observed in the deepest portion of the collapse pit, within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (Nadeau and others, 2020). The water level rose gradually over the...
thumbnail
The 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption of Kīlauea Volcano began in the late afternoon of 3 May, with fissure 1 opening and erupting lava onto Mohala Street in the Leilani Estates subdivision, part of the lower Puna District of the Island of Hawaiʻi. For the first week of the eruption, relatively viscous lava flowed only within a kilometer (0.6 miles) of the fissures within Leilani Estates, before activity shifted downrift (east-northeast) and out of the subdivision during mid-May. Around 18 May, activity along the lower East Rift Zone intensified, and fluid lava erupting at higher effusion rates from the downrift fissures reached the ocean within two days. Near the end of May, this more vigorous activity shifted...
thumbnail
In 2018, a large effusive eruption on the lower flank of Kīlauea Volcano was associated with collapse and subsidence of the summit caldera floor (Neal and others, 2019). The bottom of Halemaʻumaʻu, a crater nested within the summit caldera, subsided by more than 500 m. In July 2019, water was observed ponding on the deepest part of the Halemaʻumaʻu crater floor and the water rose and enlarged in area steadily over the next 16 months (Ingebritsen and others, 2020; Nadeau and others, 2020; Patrick and others, 2021). During the course of the rise, the lake surface appearance was highly dynamic and segmented, showing regions of variable color that changed from day to day (Nadeau and others, 2020). In June 2020 staff...
thumbnail
At 11:21 p.m. (Hawaii Standard Time [HST]) on November 27, 2022, Mauna Loa volcano on the Island of Hawaiʻi started erupting from fissures at its summit caldera, Mokuʻāweoweo. This was followed shortly afterwards by the opening of a segment of fissures in the direction of the Southwest Rift Zone. These were mostly within the structural boundary of the caldera, so their location is denoted as ‘South Caldera,’ with the exception of a short fissure that extended into the uppermost Southwest Rift Zone. By November 28, activity had shifted to four fissures that opened in the upper Northeast Rift Zone (Lynn and others, 2023). By December 2, eruptive activity was focused from Northeast Rift Zone fissure 3A supplying lava...
thumbnail
This USGS data release includes data related to the Science magazine manuscript “Cyclic lava effusion during the 2018 eruption of Kīlauea Volcano” by Patrick et al. The data release includes 1) original video as well as thermal, and timelapse images of lava in the proximal Fissure 8 channel, 2) derived estimates of lava level in the channel and bulk effusion rates (not corrected for vesicles), 3) infrasound data, and 4) other miscellaneous supporting data. The manuscript abstract is as follows: “Lava flows present a recurring threat to communities on active volcanoes, and volumetric eruption rate is one of the primary factors controlling flow behavior and hazard. The timescales and driving forces of eruption rate...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.