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Organization

Coastal and Marine Geology Program

Coastal and Marine Geology Program
Parent Organization: Natural Hazards
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Two dams on the Elwha River, Washington State, USA trapped over 20 million m3 of sediment, reducing downstream sediment fluxes and contributing to erosion of the river's coastal delta. The removal of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams between 2011 and 2014 induced massive increases in river sediment supply and provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine the response of a delta system to changes in sediment supply. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed an integrated research program aimed at understanding the ecosystem responses following dam removal. The research program included repeated surveys of beach topography, nearshore bathymetry, and surface sediment grain size to quantify changes in delta morphology...
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High resolution bathymetric, sea-floor backscatter, and seismic-reflection data were collected offshore of southeastern Louisiana aboard the research vessel Point Sur on May 19-26, 2017, in an effort to characterize mudflow hazards on the Mississippi River Delta front. As the initial field program of a research cooperative between the U.S. Geological Survey, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, and other Federal and academic partners, the primary objective of this cruise was to assess the suitability of sea-floor mapping and shallow subsurface imaging tools in the challenging environmental conditions found across delta fronts (for example, variably distributed water column stratification and widespread biogenic...
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High resolution bathymetric, sea-floor backscatter, and seismic-reflection data were collected offshore of southeastern Louisiana aboard the research vessel Point Sur on May 19-26, 2017, in an effort to characterize mudflow hazards on the Mississippi River Delta front. As the initial field program of a research cooperative between the U.S. Geological Survey, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, and other Federal and academic partners, the primary objective of this cruise was to assess the suitability of sea-floor mapping and shallow subsurface imaging tools in the challenging environmental conditions found across delta fronts (for example, variably distributed water column stratification and widespread biogenic...
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This data release includes approximately 1,032 km of marine single-channel seismic-reflection data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey on a research cruise (USGS survey 2014-632-FA) in July and August, 2014, between Point Sal and Refugio State Beach. The dataset includes 168 profiles, most of which were collected on tracklines roughly perpendicular to the coast at 1 km line spacing; additional profiles were collected on coast-parallel tie lines. These data were acquired to support the California Seafloor Mapping Program and USGS Geologic Hazards projects. Seismic-reflection data were collected using a minisparker system that creates an acoustic signal by discharging an electrical pulse between electrodes and...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected high-resolution multichannel minisparker and single-channel chirp seismic-reflection data in November 2014, in the offshore Catalina and Santa Cruz basins, which are surrounded by several of the southern California Channel Islands. The survey was designed to image faults and folds associated with movement on the numerous faults in offshore southern California, including the Catalina, Catalina Ridge, San Clemente, and San Diego Trough faults, as well as several other unnamed fault zones. These data can be used to update the USGS Quaternary fault database and in shaking hazard models developed by the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities. In addition, the...
Categories: Data; Tags: Geophysics
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