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Organization

Volcano Hazards Program

Volcano Hazards Program
Parent Organization: Natural Hazards
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The files consist of two types: tabulated data files and graphical map files. Data files consist of six .csv files, representing six experiment dates (2016_06_14, 2016_16_15, 2016_18_15, 2016_16_21, 2016_16_22, 2016_16_23). Each of these files contains multiple columns of data, with each column representing either a time measurement or the value of a physical quantity measured at that time (e.g., flow depth, pore pressure, normal stress, etc.). Map files consist of six .pdf files, each representing an experiment date listed above. The maps show the thickness of the sediment deposited onto the runout pad after each experiment. Sediment thickness was determined using photogrammetery software from Adam Technology.
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On 21 May 2016, two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments were used to measure the radiance of scattered solar radiation passing through the plume emitted from Sabancaya Volcano, Peru. Spectra were recorded in the ultraviolet (UV: 280 – 425 nm) and visible (Vis: 450 – 780 nm) wavelength ranges at 0.6 and 1.2 nm resolution, respectively. Two distinct experiments were performed using different measurement geometries. In the first experiment, two zenith-looking telescopes were mounted on a vehicle, each coupling scattered sunlight into one of the two DOAS spectrometers. The vehicle traversed beneath Sabancaya’s volcanic plume between 16:43 to 17:39 UTC collecting 2075 UV spectra and an equal...
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This digital database is the product of collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey, the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research Potsdam, Foothill College GeoSpatial Technology Certificate Program, and the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska. The primary goal for creating this digital database is to enhance current estimates of organic carbon stored in deep permafrost, in particular Late Pleistocene syngenetic ice-rich loess permafrost deposits, called Yedoma. This deposit is vulnerable to thermokarst and erosion due to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. The original paper maps were issued by the Department of Natural Resources of the Russian Federation or its predecessor the...
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This dataset contains shapefiles and associated metadata for Kīlauea volcano's Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō episode 61g lava flow from May 24, 2016 through May 31, 2017. Episode 61g began with a breakout from the east flank of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō on May 24, 2016. Lava reached the Pacific Ocean at Kamokuna on July 26, 2017, and began building a lava delta that extended seaward from the original coastline. This lava delta collapsed into the ocean on December 31, 2016, as reflected in the data for January 12, 2017 and thereafter. The episode 61g lava flow continues as of May 31, 2017, the date of the last mapping to contribute to this dataset. One mapping date is included for each calendar month - usually late in the month - from May 2016 through...
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Degassing thermal features at Yellowstone National Park include spectacular geysers, roiling hot springs, bubbling mud pots, fumaroles, frying pans, and areas of passive degassing characterized by steaming ground. Most of these features are readily identified by visible clouds of steam that are occasionally accompanied by a strong “rotten egg” odor from emissions of hydrogen sulfide gas. Gas compositions typically are greater than 90% carbon dioxide with lesser amounts of helium, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, methane, nitrogen and other trace components. The composition of the gas and relative amounts of gas and steam relate both to the type of feature as well as the geographic location within the park. In 2003 we...
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