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Organization

Volcano Hazards Program

Volcano Hazards Program
Parent Organization: Natural Hazards
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This digital database is the product of collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey, the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research Potsdam, Foothill College GeoSpatial Technology Certificate Program, and the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska. The primary goal for creating this digital database is to enhance current estimates of organic carbon stored in deep permafrost, in particular Late Pleistocene syngenetic ice-rich loess permafrost deposits, called Yedoma. This deposit is vulnerable to thermokarst and erosion due to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. The original paper maps were issued by the Department of Natural Resources of the Russian Federation or its predecessor the...
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On 21 May 2016, two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments were used to measure the radiance of scattered solar radiation passing through the plume emitted from Sabancaya Volcano, Peru. Spectra were recorded in the ultraviolet (UV: 280 – 425 nm) and visible (Vis: 450 – 780 nm) wavelength ranges at 0.6 and 1.2 nm resolution, respectively. Two distinct experiments were performed using different measurement geometries. In the first experiment, two zenith-looking telescopes were mounted on a vehicle, each coupling scattered sunlight into one of the two DOAS spectrometers. The vehicle traversed beneath Sabancaya’s volcanic plume between 16:43 to 17:39 UTC collecting 2075 UV spectra and an equal...
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Glacier Peak is a 3,214 m (10,544 ft.) stratovolcano composed mainly of dacite. The volcano is located in the Glacier Peak Wilderness Area, in the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, about 100 km (65 mi) northeast of Seattle and 110 km (70 mi) south of the International Boundary with Canada. Since the continental ice sheets receded from the region approximately 15,000 years ago, Glacier Peak has erupted repeatedly during at least six episodes. Two of these eruptions were among the largest in the Cascades during this time period. This DEM (digital elevation model) of Glacier Peak is the product of high-precision airborne lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) surveys performed during August-November, 2014 and June,...
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The data files consist of four .csv files, with one file for each of four experiment dates (1994_06_21, 1994_06_23, 1997_05_20, and 1997_05_22). Each file contains multiple columns of data, with each column representing either a time measurement or the value of a physical quantity (flow depth, h, flow speed, u, or run-up height, H) measured at that time. Detailed descriptions of column headings are provided below. The .csv files are easily imported into Microsoft Excel as well as a wide variety of other programs. The data are unclassified and no legal restrictions pertain to their use.
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On 14-15 August 2015, helicopter-based measurements were made of the volcanic gases emitted from Mount Cleveland, AK. An upward-looking differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system was used to measure incident scattered solar ultraviolet radiation while traversing beneath the plume on multiple occasions 14-15 August. This data was used to derive SO2 emission rates. Additionally, a Multi-Component Gas Analyzer System (Multi-GAS) was used to make measurements of trace gas concentrations while on a dedicated measurement flight passing through the gas plume on 15 August (19:15 - 19:56 UTC). Radiance spectra and gas compositions were both recorded at 1 second time resolution. Each spectrum and gas measurement...
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