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Person

Laura Medalie

Hydrologist

New England Water Science Center

Email: lmedalie@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 802-828-4512
Fax: 802-828-4465
ORCID: 0000-0002-2440-2149

Location
P.O. Box 628
Montpelier , VT 05602-2956
US

Supervisor: Joseph D Ayotte
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Network - Rivers and Streams (NWQN) is comprised of 110 surface-water monitoring sites designed to track ambient water-quality conditions across the nation. Although numerous constituents, including pesticides, have been collected at many of these sites since 1991, glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were not routinely measured in NWQN water samples prior to 2014. Because of the widespread use of glyphosate for agricultural and nonagricultural applications, in 2014, these two compounds were added to the NWQN. This dataset includes concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA from water samples collected from 2015 through 2017 at 70 NWQN...
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Approximately 44.1 million people (about 14 percent of the U.S. population) rely on domestic wells as their source of drinking water. Unlike community water systems, which are regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act, there is no comprehensive national program for testing domestic well water to ensure that is it safe to drink. There are many activities, e.g., resource extraction, climate change-induced drought, and changes in land use patterns that could potentially affect the quality of the ground water source for domestic wells. The Health Studies Branch (HSB) of the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, created a Clean Water for Health Program to help address domestic...
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Approximately 43 million people (about 14 percent of the U.S. population) rely on domestic wells as their source of drinking water. Unlike community water systems, which are regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act, there is no comprehensive national program to ensure that the water is tested to ensure that is it safe to drink. A study published in 2009 from the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey that assessed water-quality conditions from 2,100 domestic wells within 48 states reported that more than one in five (23 percent) of the sampled wells contained one or more contaminants at a concentration greater than a human-health benchmark. In addition, there are many activities,...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, assessed the physical and chemical characteristics and the occurrence, distribution, and oxidation state of inorganic arsenic in drinking water from selected domestic well-water supplies in Maine in 2001-2 and 2006-7. The data collected provide support for evaluating arsenic-removal efficiencies of household water-purification systems and provide information to State and local officials that can be used in determining a water-treatment approach for the removal of arsenic from drinking water.
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Dissolved pesticides were measured in weekly water samples from 482 wadeable streams in five regions of the United States during 2013-2017, as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Regional Stream Quality Assessment (RSQA). One study was conducted each year, starting with the Midwest (2013), followed by the Southeast Piedmont (2014), Pacific Northwest (2015), Northeast (2016), and Central California Coast (2017). Within each region, 77-100 streams were sampled over 6-14 weeks, followed by ecological surveys of fish, invertebrate and fish communities. The first study (Midwest) is an agricultural-gradient study, where the majority of sites were located along a gradient from undeveloped to 100% agricultural land...
Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Alabama, California, Central California Foothills ecoregion, Coastal Mountains ecoregion, Connecticut, All tags...
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