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Jared W Kluesner

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High-resolution multichannel minisparker and chirp seismic-reflection data were collected in August of 2015 to explore marine geologic hazards of inland waterways of southeastern Alaska. Sub-bottom profiles were acquired in the inland waters between Glacier Bay and Juneau, including Cross Sound and Chatham Strait. High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles were acquired to assess evidence for active seabed faulting and submarine landslide hazards. The data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Alaskan Gyre. Chirp data were acquired using a tow-fish Edgetech 512 chirp subbottom profiler, and multichannel (mcs) minisparker data were acquired using a 500-Joule minisparker source and a 48-channel Geometrics...
Categories: Data; Tags: Geophysics
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected high-resolution multichannel sparker, minisparker and chirp seismic-reflection data in November 2014, from offshore Catalina and Santa Cruz basins. The survey was designed to image faults and folds associated with movement on the faults in offshore southern California, including the Catalina, Catalina Ridge, San Clemente, and San Diego Trough faults. Data were collected aboard the Scripps Institution of Oceanography R/V Robert Gordon Sproul. Subbottom acoustic penetration spans several hundred meters and is variable by location. This data release contains processed digital SEG-Y. The seismic-reflection profiles of bedrock, sediment deposits and tectonic structure provide...
Categories: Data, Data Release - Revised; Tags: Geophysics
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This data release contains processed high-resolution multichannel sparker seismic-reflection (MCS) data that were collected aboard Humboldt State University’s R/V Coral Sea in October of 2018 on U.S. Geological Survey cruise 2018-658-FA on the shelf and slope between Cape Blanco, Oregon, and Cape Mendocino, California. MCS data were collected to characterize quaternary deformation and sediment dynamics along the southern Cascadia margin.
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Marine geophysical mapping of the Queen Charlotte Fault in the eastern Gulf of Alaska was conducted in 2016 as part of a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to understand the morphology and subsurface geology of the entire Queen Charlotte system. The Queen Charlotte fault is the offshore portion of the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault: a major structural feature that extends more than 1,200 kilometers from the Fairweather Range of southern Alaska to northern Vancouver Island, Canada. The data published in this data release were collected along the Queen Charlotte Fault between Cross Sound and Noyes Canyon, offshore southeastern Alaska from May 18 to...
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Marine geophysical mapping of the Queen Charlotte Fault in the eastern Gulf of Alaska was conducted in 2016 as part of a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to understand the morphology and subsurface geology of the entire Queen Charlotte system. The Queen Charlotte fault is the offshore portion of the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault: a major structural feature that extends more than 1,200 kilometers from the Fairweather Range of southern Alaska to northern Vancouver Island, Canada. The data published in this data release were collected along the Queen Charlotte Fault between Cross Sound and Noyes Canyon, offshore southeastern Alaska from May 18 to...
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