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Yinphan Tsang

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For the past few years, “king tides,” or the highest tides of the year, have been occurring more frequently and significantly affecting coastal environments across Hawaiʻi. Now, disappearing beaches and waves crashing over roadways are seemingly the “new normal.” In response, the state of Hawaiʻi is implementing adaptation strategies to combat tidal flooding in coastal areas. While flood management strategies are being implemented in urban areas, less is known about how tidal flooding, and associated inundation into surface and groundwater, might influence watershed dynamics and the native animals that depend on estuarine environments where freshwater meets the sea. Efforts for biocultural restoration of ecosystem...
Streams are like the blood vessels of the body weaving through the lands, collecting and delivering essential resources from land to the ocean. Flowing water, on its way to the ocean, becomes a corridor for the movement of organisms that connect and sustain ecosystems from mountain ridges to the sea. Looking into the long term records of streamflow, this project found that the majority of streamflow in Hawai‘i is decreasing resulting in drier conditions. When applying the projected changes in climate, the simulated streamflow outputs indicated likely increases in the frequency and duration of no-flow conditions in Hawaiian streams. Both long-term trends and simulated future streamflows indicate the impact drier...
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Abstract (from Journal of Hydrology): Flooding is a significant threat to life and property in Hawaiʻi. As climate warming continues to alter precipitation patterns and hydrological processes in the tropics, characterizing the shifting patterns in magnitude, seasonality, and location of floods would improve our understanding of the consequences and better prepare us for future flood events. In this study, 84 rain gauges and 111 crest gauges across five major Hawaiian Islands were analyzed from 1970 to 2005. We estimated trends in the annual maximum daily rainfall (RFmax) and the annual peak flow (PFmax) using the Mann-Kendall test and Senʻs slope. Subsequently, we examined the association between PFmax and rainfall....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
Abstract (from Science of the Total Environment): Changes in climate are known to alter air temperature and precipitation and their associated thermal and hydrological regimes of freshwater systems, and such alterations in habitat are anticipated to modify fish composition in fluvial systems. Despite these expected changes, assessing climate change effects on habitat and fish over large regions has proven challenging. The goal of this study is to describe an approach to assess and identify stream reaches within a large region that are susceptible to climate changes based on responses of multiple fish species to changes in thermal and hydrological habitats occurring with changes in climate. We present a six-step...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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This dataset contains information about waterfall locations and estimated waterfall heights on five of the main Hawaiian Islands including Kauai, Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and Hawaii. Initial spatial information was gathered from the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), the Hawaii Statewide GIS Program, and the World Waterfall Database. Where image quality permitted, the coordinates and spatial attributes from source data were used to verify and improve the quality of waterfall locations using Google Earth Pro (Google Inc. 2017)and the USGS HydroLink Tool. The HydroLink Tool was also used to link data to both the NHDPlusV2.1 and NHD High Resolution datasets by adding NHD addressing...
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