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Person

Inge Delius

Student trainee (Physical Science)

Geologic Hazards Science Center

Email: idelius@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 303-273-8604

Location
1711 Illinois St
P.O. Box 25046
Denver , CO 80225-0046
US

Supervisor: Jeffrey A Coe
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Chalk Cliffs, located 8 miles southwest of Buena Vista, Colorado, is one of the most active debris-flow areas in the state (U.S. Geological Survey). This "Child item" page includes videos of debris flows captured by one of the high-definition cameras at the monitoring site in Chalk Cliffs, CO. This camera (Wide-angle camera) is located near Station 1 on the opposite side of the basin with a broad view of the channel. The attached figure "station_and_camera_locations.png" provides an overview figure with the location of the three cameras and three stations along the channel. Video recording for all cameras is triggered using a rainfall threshold, derived from rainfall measurements from a rain gauge (Michel et al.,...
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A time-lapse camera was used to document periodic reactivation of a complex landslide on a steep coastal bluff in Mukilteo, Washington. This landslide is one of four monitoring sites initiated by the U.S Geological Survey to investigate hill-slope hydrology and landslide hazards affecting the railway corridor along the eastern shore of Puget Sound between the cities of Seattle and Everett (Mirus et al., 2016; Smith et al. 2017). The camera was installed in the crown of the landslide above the main scarp facing roughly North, with a field of view that includes the head of the landslide body and a minor scarp below. The attached file ‘CameraLocation.PNG’ provides an overview figure of the landslide and the camera’s...
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Chalk Cliffs, located 8 miles southwest of Buena Vista, Colorado, is one of the most active debris-flow areas in the state (U.S. Geological Survey). Three stations were set up at Chalk Cliffs which are located sequentially along a channel draining the 0.3 km2 study area. These stations are equipped with rain gauges, laser distance meters, and data loggers to record rainfall and stage data (Kean, et al., 2020). This data release includes videos of debris-flows and floods captured by high-definition cameras placed at two different locations, associated with the monitoring stations, along the study area at Chalk Cliffs during 2015. Both cameras are located near the Upper Station (Station 1). One is located at the bridge...
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Chalk Cliffs, located 8 miles southwest of Buena Vista, Colorado, is one of the most active debris-flow areas in the state (U.S. Geological Survey). This "Child item" page includes videos of debris flows captured by one of the high-definition cameras at the monitoring site in Chalk Cliffs, CO. This camera (Middle camera) is located near Station 2. The attached figure "station_and_camera_locations.png" provides an overview figure with the location of the three cameras and three stations along the channel. Video recording for all cameras is triggered using a rainfall threshold, derived from rainfall measurements from rain gauges (Michel et al., 2019). The complete videos for all the cameras are downloaded manually...
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Chalk Cliffs, located 8 miles southwest of Buena Vista, Colorado, is one of the most active debris-flow areas in the state (U.S. Geological Survey). This "Child item" page includes videos of debris flows captured by one of the high-definition cameras at the monitoring site in Chalk Cliffs, CO. This camera (Bridge Camera) is located at Station 1 which is at the bridge cross section at the channel. The attached figure "station_and_camera_locations.png" provides an overview figure with the location of the two cameras and three stations along the channel. Video recording for all cameras is triggered using a rainfall threshold, derived from rainfall measurements from a rain gauge (Michel et al., 2019). The complete...
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