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Sharon L Qi

Physical Scientist

Colorado Water Science Center

Email: slqi@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 503-579-0668
Fax: 360-993-8981
ORCID: 0000-0001-7278-4498

Supervisor: Jeannette H Oden
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Arsenic concentrations from 20,450 domestic wells in the U.S. were used to develop a logistic regression model of the probability of having arsenic > 10 µg/L (“high arsenic”), which is presented at the county, state, and national scales. Variables representing geologic sources, geochemical, hydrologic, and physical features were among the significant predictors of high arsenic. For U.S. Census blocks, the mean probability of arsenic > 10 µg/L was multiplied by the population using domestic wells to estimate the potential high-arsenic domestic-well population. Approximately 44.1 M people in the U.S. use water from domestic wells. The population in the conterminous U.S. using water from domestic wells with predicted...
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These model archive summaries document the surrogate regression models developed to estimate 15-minute suspended-sediment concentrations at three streamgage sites in Colorado: Anthracite Creek above Mouth near Somerset, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) site number 09132095; Muddy Creek above Paonia Reservoir, USGS site number 385903107210800; and North Fork Gunnison below Raven Gulch near Somerset, USGS site number 385553107243301. The methods used follow USGS guidance as referenced in relevant Office of Surface Water Technical Memorandum (TM) 2016.07 and Office of Water Quality TM 2016.10, USGS Techniques and Methods, book 3, chap. C5 (Landers and others, 2016), and (or) USGS Techniques and Methods, book 3, chap....
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In 2013, the first of several Regional Stream Quality Assessments (RSQA) was done in the Midwest United States. The Midwest Stream Quality Assessment (MSQA) was a collaborative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA), the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA). One of the objectives of the RSQA, and thus the MSQA, is to characterize the relationships between water-quality stressors and stream ecology and to determine the relative effects of these stressors on aquatic biota within the streams (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012). To meet this objective, a framework of fundamental...
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In 2015, the second of several Regional Stream Quality Assessments (RSQA) was done in the southeastern United States. The Southeast Stream Quality Assessment (SESQA) was a study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) project. One of the objectives of the RSQA, and thus the SESQA, is to characterize the relationships between water-quality stressors and stream ecology and subsequently determine the relative effects of these stressors on aquatic biota within the streams (Van Metre and Journey, 2014). To meet this objective, a framework of fundamental geospatial data was required to develop physical and anthropogenic characteristics of the study region, sampled sites and corresponding...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board and Bureau of Land Management compiled and analyzed data for mapping groundwater salinity in selected oil and gas fields in California. The data for the South Cuyama oil field includes well construction data, digitized borehole geophysical data, geochemical analyses of water samples from oil and gas wells and groundwater wells, geological formation depths, and the groundwater total dissolved solids (TDS) calculations. These data have been compiled from many sources and span several decades. The well construction data includes attributes such as the date drilling began (spud date), borehole orientation, well depth...
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