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Person

John F Stamm

Supervisory Hydrologist

Caribbean-Florida Water Science Center

Email: jstamm@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 813-498-5054
Fax: 813-498-5002
ORCID: 0000-0002-3404-2933

Supervisor: Dorothy F Sifuentes
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This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release consists of evapotranspiration measurements made at the USGS Immokalee row crop climate station beginning September 22, 2008 and ending January 8, 2009. Daily evapotranspiration rates corrected to a near-surface energy-budget varied from 0.1 millimeter (9/28/2008) to 3.3 millimeters (9/24/2008). The eddy-covariance method was used, with high-frequency sensors installed above an experimental field planted in green peppers to measure sensible and latent heat fluxes. Ancillary meteorological data are also included in the data set: net radiation, soil temperature and moisture, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and ground-water level. Data were...
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The Prairie Pothole Region spans parts of North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa and south-central Canada and contains millions of wetlands that provide habitat for breeding and migrating birds. Because it is the continent’s most important breeding area for waterfowl, conservation and management largely focuses on protecting habitat for nesting ducks. However, other wetland-dependent birds also rely on this region, and it is important to understand the degree to which habitat conserved for ducks provides habitat for other species, and how the quality of this habitat will be affected by climate change. Project researchers tested whether waterfowl are effective representatives, or surrogates, for other wetland-dependent...
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This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release consists of evapotranspiration measurements made at the USGS Starkey pasture climate station beginning January 1, 2010 and ending April 30, 2016. Annual ET rates corrected to a near-surface energy-budget for the 12 calendar years of record at this site (2004-2015) varied from 718 mm (2007) to 903 mm (2010). The eddy-covariance method was used, with high-frequency sensors installed above the pasture to measure sensible and latent heat fluxes. Ancillary meteorological data are also included in the data set: net radiation, soil temperature and moisture, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, rainfall, and ground-water levels. Data were collected...
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Human-driven climate change presents natural resource managers with great uncertainties. Planning and executing effective management in the face of these uncertainties requires approaches nimble enough to address a broad range of interacting factors yet scientifically rigorous enough to support decisions and actions when faced with public scrutiny. Complex interactions among management practices and climate further stymie managers trying to plan for the future. Wind Cave National Park epitomizes this complexity hydrologically with its karst geology, sinking streams, and cave lakes, and ecologically with its prairie-forest ecotonal vegetation, large ungulate herds, and prescribed and wild fires. This project partnered...
Categories: Project
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In this project researchers are assessing the links between climate, groundwater storage, spring flow, and ecosystem response in two contrasting major U.S. karst systems: the Edwards and Madison aquifers. Karst aquifers are uniquely suited for investigating effects of climate variability at timescales of human interest because they are highly dynamic; further, many provide habitat for rare and endangered species. The principal objective of this project is to determine how interrelations between karst hydrology and ecosystems will be affected by climate change. Current relations between recharge (impulse) and storage and spring flow (response) are quantified through signal-processing models that use existing...
Categories: Project
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