Skip to main content

Alison Meadow

thumbnail
These three PDFs contain qualitative notes taken during focus group-style interviews in 2017 with coastal resource managers Grand Bay, AL; Port Aransas, TX; and Tampa Bay, FL about their data needs related to tidal wetlands and sea level rise and interest in working with USGS researchers to receive that data. The coastal managers were all engaged in conversations with USGS scientists as part of a separate project entitled Landscape conservation design for enhancing the adaptive capacity of coastal wetlands in the face of sea-level rise and coastal development, regarding tidal wetlands in the Gulf Coast region and the ability of investigators leading that project to provide data suitable for use in various resource...
thumbnail
This data is from a survey of participants in four workshops hosted by USGS researchers in collaboration with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in communities along the Gulf Coast in 2017. The workshops were part of the Landscape conservation design project, funded separately by the USGS. The current project had no role in identifying or selected coastal managers with whom to speak; that was the responsibility of the Landscape conservation design project and occurred before the involvement of the current project team. These data are particular to the interactions between the Landscape conservation design project team and the particular coastal managers who engaged with their project. The workshops were held in: Milton,...
Abstract (from http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/full/10.1175/WCAS-D-16-0008.1): Resource managers and decision-makers are increasingly tasked with integrating climate change science into their decisions about resource management and policy development. This often requires climate scientists, resource managers, and decision-makers to work collaboratively throughout the research processes, an approach to knowledge development that is often called “coproduction of knowledge.” The goal of this paper is to synthesize the social science theory of coproduction of knowledge, the metrics currently used to evaluate usable or actionable science in several federal agencies, and insights from experienced climate researchers and...
thumbnail
There is increasing and broad recognition of the importance of Indigenous and local knowledge in leading climate change adaptation. Indigenous peoples and nations are on the front lines of climate change impacts, yet they are also leading the way in many innovative adaptation actions, such as traditional or cultural burning practices - a form of low-intensity understory-burning that promotes ecosystem health and builds cultural resilience. The overarching goal of this project is to better understand and establish traditional burning as a robust adaptation strategy, based on the practice’s own merits and/or as a complementary approach to other conventional ecosystem restoration practices. Focusing on central California,...
This project was designed to test whether the quality of engagement between climate scientists and resource managers and the subsequent usability of the science produce changed when a social scientist was added to a research project to guide engagement activities. The goal of the project was to use social science expertise to strengthen engagement and, through the stakeholder engagement, improve the delivery and use of climate science data. In the two cases we completed, we observed that social science expertise did change the nature of engagements between the climate scientists and stakeholders and the attitude of the scientists toward working directly with stakeholders. In the first case, the most significant...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.