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This layer represents areas which have been proposed (per the requirements of Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005) as West-wide energy corridors for the final "Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in the 11 Western States", November 2008. The layer was intersected with surface management agency, BLM field office, and state layers to add more tabular attributes.
As electricity demand increases, policymakers must make decisions about which energy resources will meet future demands. Much of the recent literature has focused on the contribution of new coal power plants to carbon emissions (Milford et al., 2005; Milford et al., 2007; MIT 2007). However, policymakers and industry are increasingly interested in job creation and economic development analyses to understand the full impacts of new electricity generation projects.1 Additionally, economic development impacts are often a critical piece in building public support for wind power projects. The purpose of this research is to look at the specific factors that drive wind-power-related economic development and to better understand...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Water, issues, oil, production
Recent research has focused on perceptions of risk as a dominant source of economic impacts due to siting a high level radioactive waste facility. This article addresses the social and economic considerations involved with (he issue of risk perception and other types of negative imagery. Emphasis is placed on ways of measuring the potential tor economic effects resulting from perceptions prior to construction and operation of a HLW facility. We describe the problems in arriving at defensible estimates of economic impacts. Our review has found that although legal and regulatory bases may soon allow inclusion of these impacts in EIS and for compensation purposes, credible scientific methods do not currently exist...
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