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B. Chouet

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Following an initial phreatic eruption on 21 December 1994, activity at Popocatepetl has been dominated by fumarolic emissions interspersed with more energetic emissions of ashes and gases. A phase of repetitive dome-building and dome-destroying episodes began in March 1996 and is still ongoing at present. We describe the long-period (LP) seismicity accompanying eruptive activity at Popocatepetl from December 1994 through May 2000, using data from a three-component broadband seismometer located 5 km from the summit crater. The broadband records display a variety of signals, with periods ranging in the band 0.04-90 s. Long-period events and tremor with typical dominant periods in the range 0.3-2.0 s are the most...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Bulletin of Volcanology
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We investigate the performance of a source location method that combines multichannel semblance and particle motions and is being increasingly used to obtain estimates of the source locations of very long period (VLP) seismic signals recorded on volcanoes. The method makes use of the radial particle motions and large wavelengths that characterize the VLP events. To assess the capabilities of this radial semblance method, and to better understand its limitations, we quantify the effects of window length, noise contents of the signal, inaccurate velocity models, receiver coverage, and orientation errors in the horizontal components of the receivers. Our results show that the semblance method performs best when (1)...
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The properties of the tremor wave field at Stromboli are analyzed using data from small-aperture arrays of short-period seismometers deployed on the north flank of the volcano. The seismometers are configued in two semi-circular arrays with radii of 60 and 150 m and a linear array with length of 600 m. The data are analyzed using a spatiotemporal correlation technique specifically designed for the study of the stationary stochastic wave field of Rayleigh and Love waves generated by volcanic activity and by scattering sources distributed within the island. The correlation coefficients derived as a function of frequency for the three components of motion clearly define the dispersion characteristics for both Rayleigh...
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Fractal singularity analysis (FSA) is used to study a 22-yr record of deep seismic tremor (30-60 km depth) for regions below Kilauea Volcano on the assumption that magma transport and fracture can be treated as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators. Tremor episodes range from 1 to 100 min (cumulative duration = 1.60 ?? 104 min; yearly average - 727 min yr-1; mean gradient = 24.2 min yr-1km-1). Partitioning of probabilities, Pi, in the phase space of normalized durations, xi, are expressed in terms of a function f(??), where ?? is a variable exponent of a length scale, l. Plots of f(??) vs. ?? are called multifractal singularity spectra. The spectrum for deep tremor durations is bounded by ?? values of about...
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The wave fields generated by Strombolian activity are investigated using data from small-aperture seismic arrays deployed on the north flank of Stromboli and data from seismic and pressure transducers set up near the summit crater. Measurements of slowness and azimuth as a function of time clearly indicate that the sources of tremor and explosions are located beneath the summit crater at depths shallower than 200 m with occasional bursts of energy originating from sources extending to a depth of 3 km. Slowness, azimuth, and particle motion measurements reveal a complex composition of body and surface waves associated with topography, structure, and source properties. Body waves originating at depths shallower than...
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