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Bergeron, Yves

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In North America, the last ice age is the most recent event with severe consequences on boreal species’ ranges. Phylogeographic patterns of range expansion in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) suggested that Beringia is likely to be a refugium and the “ice-free corridor” in Alberta may represent a region where small populations persisted during the last glacial maximum (LGM). The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether the origins of trembling aspen in western North America are reflected in the patterns of neutral genetic diversity and population structure. A total of 28 sites were sampled covering the northwestern part of aspen’s distribution, from Saskatchewan to Alaska. Twelve microsatellite markers...
Five independent multicentury reconstructions of the July Canadian Drought Code and one reconstruction of the mean July-August temperature were developed using a network of 120 well-replicated tree-ring chronologies covering the area of the eastern Boreal Plains to the eastern Boreal Shield of Canada. The reconstructions were performed using 54 time-varying reconstruction submodels that explained up to 50% of the regional drought variance during the period of 1919-84. Spatial correlation fields on the six reconstructions revealed that the meridional component of the climate system from central to eastern Canada increased since the mid-nineteenth century. The most obvious change was observed in the decadal scale...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
Question: What are the drivers of bryophyte succession in paludifying boreal Picea mariana forests? Location: The Clay-Belt of Quebec and Ontario, Canada. Methods: The bryophyte community and habitat variables (forest floor thickness, water table, stand density, canopy openness micro-climate and presence of ericaceous species) were analysed in a chronosequence of 13 stands from 50 to more than 350 years since fire. Results: Across the chronosequence, feathermosses were replaced by shade and desiccation tolerant slower growing hummock Sphagna and then by faster growing hollow Sphagna. These changes were linked with both increasing light availability and the movement of the water table into the forest floor. Conclusions:...
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