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D.R. Lovley

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The potential for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to enzymatically reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) was investigated. Five species of Desulfovibrio as well as Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobulbus propionicus reduced Fe(III) chelated with nitrilotriacetic acid as well as insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Fe(III) oxide reduction resulted in the accumulation of magnetite and siderite. Desulfobacter postgatei reduced the chelated Fe(III) but not Fe(III) oxide. Desulfobacter curvatus, Desulfomonile tiedjei, and Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans did not reduce Fe(III). Only Desulfovibrio species reduced U(VI). U(VI) reduction resulted in the precipitation of uraninite. None of the SRB that reduced Fe(III) or U(VI) appeared to conserve...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Marine Geology
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The different oxidation species of iodine have markedly different sorption properties. Hence, changes in iodine redox states can greatly affect the mobility of iodine in the environment. Although a major microbial role has been suggested in the past to account for these redox changes, little has been done to elucidate the responsible microorganisms or the mechanisms involved. In the work presented here, direct microbial reduction of iodate was demonstrated with anaerobic cell suspensions of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans which reduced 96% of an initial 100 ??M iodate to iodide at pH 7 in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, whereas anaerobic cell suspensions of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium...
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A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing bacterium was isolated from bottom sediments of the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire. The isolate was a facultatively anaerobic gram-negative rod which did not appear to fit into any previously described genus. It was temporarily designated strain BrY. BrY grew anaerobically in a defined medium with hydrogen or lactate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. BrY required citrate, fumarate, or malate as a carbon source for growth on H2 and Fe(III). With Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, BrY metabolized hydrogen to a minimum threshold at least 60-fold lower than the threshold reported for pure cultures of sulfate reducers. This finding supports...
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The potential for using concentrations of dissolved H2 to determine the distribution of redox processes in anoxic groundwaters was evaluated. In pristine aquifers in which standard geochemical measurements indicated that Fe-(III) reduction, sulfate reduction, or methanogenesis was the terminal electron accepting process (TEAP), the H2 concentrations were similar to the H2 concentrations that have previously been reported for aquatic sediments with the same TEAPs. In two aquifers contaminated with petroleum products, it was impossible with standard geochemical analyses to determine which TEAPs predominated in specific locations. However, the TEAPs predicted from measurements of dissolved H2 were the same as those...
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The potential utility of 55Fe as a tracer for Fe(III) reduction in aquatic sediments was evaluated using freshwater sediments from the Potomac River, Md, in which Fe(III) reduction was the predominant terminal electron accepting process. In laboratory incubations of sediments amended with poorly crystalline 55Fe(III) oxide, the accumulation of 55Fe in Fe(II) over time paralleled Fe(II) production. -from Authors
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Geomicrobiology Journal
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