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David J. Parsons

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Atmospheric depostion and stream discharge and solutes were measured for three years (September 1984 - August 1987) in two mixed conifer watersheds in Sequoia National Park, in the southern Sierra Nevada of California. The Log Creek watershed (50 ha, 2067-2397 m elev.) is drained by a perennial stream, while Tharp's Creek watershed (13 ha, 2067-2255 m elev.) contains an intermittent stream. Dominant trees in the area include Abies concolor (white fir), Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia), A. magnifica (red fir), and Pinus lambertiana (sugar pine). Bedrock is predominantly granite and granodiorite, and the soils are mostly Pachic Xerumbrepts. Over the three year period, sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-), and chloride...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Biogeochemistry
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An inventory of the severity and spatial distribution of wilderness campsite impacts in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks identified a total of 273 distinct nodes of campsites or “management areas.” A campsite impact matrix was developed to evaluate management areas based on total impacts (correlated to the total area of campsite development) and the density, or concentration, of impacts relative to each area's potentially campable area. The matrix is used to quantify potential recreational opportunities for wilderness visitors in a spectrum from areas offering low impact-dispersed camping to those areas offering high impact-concentrated camping. Wilderness managers can use this type of information to evaluate...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Environmental Management
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Recreational use of wilderness results in impacts to vegetation and soil in trails and campsites. Traditionally, campsite impact studies have compared campsites receiving various levels of use with unused control areas. Field studies in Sequoia National Park, California, indicate that the degree of impact to vegetation and soils also varies within campsites. The central areas of campsites, where trampling is concentrated, show lower plant species diversity, differences in relative species cover, more highly compacted soils, and lower soil nutrient concentrations than do peripheral, moderately trampled, and untrampled areas within the same campsite. Three years after closure to visitor use, the central areas show...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Environmental Management
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Sequoia National Park has monitored wet deposition chemistry in conjunction with the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network (NADP/NTN), on a weekly basis since July, 1980. Annual deposition of H, NO3 and SO4 (0.045, 3.6, and 3.9 kg ha−1 a−1, respectively) is relatively low compared to that measured in the eastern United States, or in the urban Los Angeles and San Francisco areas. Weekly ion concentrations are highly variable. Maximum concentrations of 324,162, and 156 μeq ol−1 of H, NO3 and SO4 have been recorded for one low volume summer storm (1.4 mm). Summer concentrations of NO3 and SO4 average two and five times higher, respectively, than concentrations reported for remote areas...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Atmospheric Environment
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We investigated the effects of herbage removal on three subalpine meadow plant communities in the Rock Creek drainage of Sequoia National Park, California, USA. In the xeric Carex exserta Mkze. (short-hair sedge) type, annual aboveground productivity averaged 19 g/m2 in control plots (clipped once after plant senescence in late September) over a five-year period. Annual aboveground productivity was enhanced about 30%–35% when plots in this community type were clipped more frequently (i.e., “additional” herbage removal in the early, mid, and late seasons) during each of four treatment years but was reduced by 13%–19% during a fifth (recovery) year in which all but late September clipping was suspended. In a moderately...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Environmental Management
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