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David Peterson

Climate change will likely have significant effects on forest ecosystems worldwide. In dryMediterranean regions, such as that in southwestern Oregon, USA, changes will likely be drivenmainly by wildfire and drought. To minimize the negative effects of climate change, resourcemanagers require tools and information to assess climate change vulnerabilities and to developand implement adaptation actions. We developed an approach to facilitate development andimplementation of climate change adaptation options in forest management. This approach,applied in a southwestern Oregon study region, involved establishment of a science–managerpartnership, a science-based assessment of forest and woodland vulnerabilities to climatechange,...
Multiple agencies and organizations in southwestern Oregon have made significant progress in collaborative restoration of forest landscapes and in projecting climate change effects and adaptation responses. We will build on these efforts by moving proposed activities forward using a climate-informed framework. Specifically, we will (1) implement “shovel-ready” restoration projects using climate-smart management practices, (2) prioritize additional proposed restoration projects informed by a recent climate change assessment, and (3) mainstream climate-smart thinking in federal planning efforts. These activities will ensure that restoration in southwestern Oregon is resilient to future climatic variability and change.
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Alpine snow is an important water resource in California and the western U.S. Three major features of alpine snowmelt are the spring pulse (the first surge in snowmelt-driven river discharge in spring), maximum snowmelt discharge, and base flow (low river discharge supported by groundwater in fall). A long term data set of hydrologic measurements at 24 gage locations in 20 watersheds in the Sierra Nevada was investigated to relate patterns of snowmelt with stream discharge In wet years, the daily variations in snowmelt discharge at all the gage locations in the Sierra Nevada correlate strongly with the centrally located Merced River at Happy Isles, Yosemite National Park (i.e., in 1983, the mean of the 23 correlations...
This fact sheet was prepared by Jessica Halofsky, David Peterson and Brian Harvey, University of Washington, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. Editorial assistance from Patti Loesche and Darcy Widmayer. Funding for this work provided by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center. This fact sheets goes with the following synthesis paper: https://doi.org/10.1186/s42408-019-0062-8.
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