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USGS - science for a changing world

Edward R. German

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Two internally drained karstic wetlands in central Florida-Boggy Marsh at the Hilochee Wildlife Management Area and a large unnamed wetland at the Lyonia Preserve-were studied during 2001-03 to gain a better understanding of the net-recharge function that these wetlands provide, the significance of exchanges with ground water with regard to wetland water budgets, and the variability in wetland hydrologic response to a range of climate conditions. These natural, relatively remote and unaltered wetlands were selected to provide a baseline of natural wetland hydrologic variability to which anthropogenic influences on wetland hydrology could be compared. Large departures from normal rainfall during the study were fortuitous,...
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In central Florida, activities that might affect the quality of ground water include disposal of stormwater through drainage wells, citrus cultivation, and mining and processing of phosphate ore. Possible effects of these and other land-use activities include high concentrations of nitrogen compounds and the pesticide bromacil in the citrus area, and high concentrations of most of the major-dissolved constituents and some organic compounds in the mining area.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Water Supply Paper
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Understanding the water budget of the Everglades system is crucial to the success of restoration and management strategies. Although the water budget is simple in concept, it is difficult to assess quantitatively. Models used to simulate changes in water levels and vegetation resulting from management strategies need to accurately simulate all components of the water budget.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Fact Sheet
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Ground water is the main source of water supply in central Florida and is critical for aquatic habitats and human consumption. To provide a better understanding for the conservation, development, and management of the water resources of Orange County, Florida, a study of the hydrogeologic framework, water budget, and ground-water quality characteristics was conducted from 1998 through 2002. The study also included extensive analyses of the surface-water resources, published as a separate report. An increase in population from about 264,000 in 1960 to 896,000 in 2000 and subsequent urban growth throughout this region has been accompanied by a substantial increase in water use. Total ground-water use in Orange County...
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Springs are natural openings in the ground through which water beneath the surface discharges into hydrologic features such as lakes, rivers, or the ocean. The beautiful springs and spring rivers are among Florida's most valued natural resources; their gemlike refreshing waters have been a focal point of life from prehistoric times to the present (2008). The steady flow of freshwater at a nearly constant water temperature attracted animals now long absent from Florida's landscape. Fossil remains and human artifacts, discovered by divers from many spring runs, attest to the importance of springs to the State's earliest inhabitants. Explorers of Florida, from Ponce de Leon to John and William Bartram and others, often...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Fact Sheet
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