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This dataset “Broad-scale assessment of biophysical features in Colorado: Soil salinity using electrical conductance” presents information extracted from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) gridded surface soils geographic database (gSSURGO). Fields retained and presented here include map unit (MU) codes and component (COMP) codes that may be used to reference records in the original, NRCS, data. Soil salinity is typically measured and evaluated based on electrical conductance (EC), and values presented here include the representative value for the map unit component (ECR) and the highest estimated value (ECH). Soils with high salinity can affect the composition of vegetation and can limit production...
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The 1935 images were obtained as digitally scanned versions of aerial photographs acquired by the U.S. Department of Agriculture at a scale of 1:31,680. The actual date of image acquisition is not known. The images were previously scanned at 600 dpi to produce a nominal pixel size of 1.28 m (Friedman et al., 2015). The images were registered and rectified using identifiable common points from the 1996 DOQQs. See description of positional accuracy below. Data derived from features mapped from the 1935 images were presented in: Friedman, J.M., Vincent, K.R., Griffin, E.R., Scott, M.L., Shafroth, P.B., and Auble, G.T., 2015, Processes of arroyo filling in northern New Mexico, USA, GSA Bulletin, 127(3/4), 621-640....
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The “Biophysical assessment for indemnity selection of federal lands in Colorado: Indemnity Unit locations” dataset delineates the spatial locations of 89 Indemnity Units, comprising 339 parcels of federal lands. These lands, currently managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), are under consideration for transfer of ownership to the State of Colorado in compensation for federal lands not available for transfer at the time of statehood. The Indemnity Units total 23,130 acres of surface and mineral estate and 6,150 acres of mineral estate only. The specific land parcels to be transferred to the State will be finalized after an environmental analysis is completed, as required by the National Environmental Policy...
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Data on body condition and reproduction of Utah prairie dogs at 5 colonies on the Awapa Plateau, Utah, USA, June-August 2013-2016. Utah prairie dogs were live-trapped and sampled on 5 colonies. We recorded the age (juvenile/adult) and mass (nearest 5 grams) of each prairie dog and marked its ears and body with metal tags and passive integrated transponders, respectively, for permanent identification. We measured each prairie dog's right hind foot length (nearest millimeter). We indexed each adult prairie dog's body condition as the ratio between its mass and hind-foot length. Prairie dogs were allowed to recover from anesthesia and released at their trapping locations. We indexed prairie dog reproduction, by colony...
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The surface disturbance footprint raster data set quantifies the percent surface disturbance from development at a 90-meter resolution. The surface disturbance footprint is used to compute a multiscale index of landscape intactness for the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) landscape approach. The surface disturbance footprint is mapped for the western United States (17 states), by compiling and combining spatial data for four development disturbance variable classes. Development classes include urban land cover (impervious surface), agriculture (cropland), energy and mineral extraction and transport (oil and gas wells, solar arrays, wind turbines, surface mines, pipelines, and transmission lines), and transportation...
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