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Fox, Patricia M

Recent studies of uranium(VI) geochemistry have focused on the potentially important role of the aqueous species, CaUO2(CO3)32− and Ca2UO2(CO3)30(aq), on inhibition of microbial reduction and uranium(VI) aqueous speciation in contaminated groundwater. However, to our knowledge, there have been no direct studies of the effects of these species on U(VI) adsorption by mineral phases. The sorption of U(VI) on quartz and ferrihydrite was investigated in NaNO3 solutions equilibrated with either ambient air (430 ppm CO2) or 2% CO2 in the presence of 0, 1.8, or 8.9 mM Ca2+. Under conditions where the Ca2UO2(CO3)30(aq) species predominates U(VI) aqueous speciation, the presence of Ca in solution lowered U(VI) adsorption...
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We examined the chemical reactions influencing dissolved concentrations, speciation, and transport of naturally occurring arsenic (As) in a shallow, sand and gravel aquifer with distinct geochemical zones resulting from land disposal of dilute sewage effluent. The principal geochemical zones were: (1) the uncontaminated zone above the sewage plume [350 µM dissolved oxygen (DO), pH 5.9]; (2) the suboxic zone (5 µM DO, pH 6.2, elevated concentrations of sewage-derived phosphate and nitrate); and (3) the anoxic zone [dissolved iron(II) 100–300 µM, pH 6.5–6.9, elevated concentrations of sewage-derived phosphate]. Sediments are comprised of greater than 90% quartz but the surfaces of quartz and other mineral grains are...
At the Naturita site in Colorado, USA, groundwaters were sampled and analyzed for chemical composition and by culture and culture-independent microbiological techniques. In addition, sediments were extracted with a dilute sodium carbonate solution to determine quantities of labile uranium within the sediments. Samples from the upgradient portion of the contaminated aquifer, where very little dissolved Fe(II) is found in the groundwater, have uranium content that is controlled by U(VI) adsorption and few metal-reducing bacteria are observed. In the extreme downgradient portion of the aquifer, where dissolved Fe(II) is observed, uranium content of the sediments includes significant quantities of reduced U(IV) and...
At the Naturita site in Colorado, USA, groundwaters were sampled and analyzed for chemical composition and by culture and culture-independent microbiological techniques. In addition, sediments were extracted with a dilute sodium carbonate solution to determine quantities of labile uranium within the sediments. Samples from the upgradient portion of the contaminated aquifer, where very little dissolved Fe(II) is found in the groundwater, have uranium content that is controlled by U(VI) adsorption and few metal-reducing bacteria are observed. In the extreme downgradient portion of the aquifer, where dissolved Fe(II) is observed, uranium content of the sediments includes significant quantities of reduced U(IV) and...
Tracer tests were performed in distinct biogeochemical zones of a sand and gravel aquifer in Cape Cod, MA, to study the redox chemistry (I) and transport (Cs, I) of cesium and iodine in a field setting. Injection of iodide (I?) into an oxic zone of the aquifer resulted in oxidation of I? to molecular iodine (I2) and iodate (IO3?) over transport distances of several meters. Oxidation is attributed to Mn-oxides present in the sediment. Transport of injected IO3? and Cs+ was retarded in the mildly acidic oxic zone, with retardation factors of 1.6?1.8 for IO3? and 2.3?4.4 for Cs. Cs retardation was likely due to cation exchange reactions. Injection of IO3? into a Fe-reducing zone of the aquifer resulted in rapid and...
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