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Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

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The Yellowstone grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) was listed as a threatened species in 1975 (Federal Register 40 FR:31734-31736). Since listing, recovery efforts have focused on increasing population size, improving habitat security, managing bear mortalities, and reducing bear-human conflicts. The Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (IGBC; partnership of federal and state agencies responsible for grizzly bear recovery in the lower 48 states) and its Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommitte (YES; federal, state, county, and tribal partners charged with recovery of grizzly bears in the Greater Yelowston Ecosystem [GYE]) tasked the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team to provide information and further research relevant to three...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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Flight Observation Units, also referred to as Bear Observation Areas (BOAs), were delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) to facilitate systematic aerial monitoring of the grizzly bear population within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Flight units were last updated in 2014 to depict 54 distinct observation areas spanning the spatial extent of the Demographic Monitoring Area established for the Yellowstone grizzly bear population.
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This dataset provides numbers of documented mortalities for independent aged ( ≥ 2-years-old) grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) from human and undetermined causes that occurred during 1998–2017 within 49-km2 (7- x 7-km) grid cells from the Greater Yellowstone (GYE) and Northern Continental Divide (NCDE) ecosystems of the western United States.
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This dataset consists of point features identifying indices for potential passage rate at intersections with major transportation corridors for grizzly bear movements between the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE) in the northwestern United States. Points are spaced at 300-meter intervals along major road corridors (interstates and U.S. highways) and are populated with values from Randomized Shortest Path (RSP) predictive raster models of potential male grizzly bear movement between the two ecosystems as described in Peck et al. 2016 (Potential paths for male-mediated gene flow to and from an isolated grizzly bear population, Ecosphere 8(10):e01969). RSP scores extracted...
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The Demographic Monitoring Area (DMA) is the boundary within which all demographic criteria for the Yellowstone grizzly bear population are currently monitored and evaluated. The DMA replaces the Conservation Strategy Management Area (CSMA) as the area within which total grizzly bear population size is estimated and biologically sustainable mortality thresholds are established. All grizzly bear observations and mortalities inside the DMA are counted toward population estimates and mortality thresholds; however, observations outside the monitoring area are also recorded and reported by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team.
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