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USGS - science for a changing world

J.D. Fallon

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Accurate mean concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can easily and economically be obtained from a single VOC analysis by using proven methods of collecting representative, discrete water samples and compositing them with a gas-tight syringe. The technique can be used in conjunction with chemical analysis by a conventional laboratory, field-portable equipment, or a mobile laboratory. The type of mean concentration desired depends on the objectives of monitoring. For example, flow-weighted mean VOC concentrations can be used to estimate mass loadings in wastewater and urban storm water, and spatially integrated mean VOC concentrations can be used to assess sources of drinking water (e.g., reservoirs...
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A mass balance approach was used to determine the most important nonpoint source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in storm water from an asphalt parking lot without obvious point sources (e.g., gasoline stations). The parking lot surface and atmosphere are important nonpoint sources of VOCs, with each being important for different VOCs. The atmosphere is an important source of soluble, oxygenated VOCs (e.g., acetone), and the parking lot surface is an important source for the more hydrophobic VOCs (e.g., benzene). VOCs on the parking lot surface appear to be concentrated in oil and grease and organic material in urban particles (e.g., vehicle soot). Except in the case of spills, asphalt does not appear to be...
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Surface-water-quality data were collected from the lower Kansas River Basin in Kansas and Nebraska. The data are presented in 17 tables consisting of physical properties, concentrations of dissolved solids and major ions, dissolved and total nutrients, dissolved and total major metals and trace elements, radioactivity, organic carbon, pesticides and other synthetic-organic compounds, bacteria and chlorophyll-a, in water; particle-size distributions and concentrations of major metals and trace elements in suspended and streambed sediment; and concentrations of synthetic-organic compounds in streambed sediment. The data are grouped within each table by sampling sites, arranged in downstream order. Ninety-one sites...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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Floods result in great human disasters globally and nationally, causing an average of $4 billion of damages each year in the United States. Minnesota has its share of floods and flood damages, and the state has awarded nearly $278 million to local units of government for flood mitigation projects through its Flood Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Since 1995, flood mitigation in the Red River Valley has exceeded $146 million. Considerable local and state funding has been provided to manage and mitigate problems of excess stormwater in urban areas, flooding of farmlands, and flood damages at road crossings. The cumulative costs involved with floods and flood mitigation in Minnesota are not known precisely, but it...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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The U.S. Geological Survey began full-scale implementation of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program in 1991. The purposes of NAWQA are to describe the status and trends in the quality of the Nation's water resources and aquatic ecosystems, and to determine factors affecting water quality at local, regional, and national scales. The Upper Mississippi River (UMIS) NAWQA study unit, which includes all of the surface drainage to the Mississippi River Basin upstream from Lake Pepin, encompasses 47,000 mi2. The study characterizes the geographic and seasonal distribution of water quality and aquatic biota in relation to anthropogenic activities and natural features. The initial phase of the UMIS study,...
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