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Jason MacKenzie

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The Nature Conservancy (TNC) has derived climate suitability forecasts for most species of trees and shrubs considered to be ecological dominants of terrestrial Californian habitat types. Our plant projections are compiled as decision support tools to help Conservancy project staff, as well as our external partners, develop the necessary plans, priorities and strategies to successfully adapt to uncertain changes in future climate. In the recently completed Southern Sierra Partnership's 2010 Climate-Adapted Conservation Plan for the Southern Sierra Nevada and Tehachapi Mountains, species and habitat forecasts shown here informed the development of a regional conservation design that explicitly incorporates long-term...
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The Nature Conservancy (TNC) has derived climate suitability forecasts for most species of trees and shrubs considered to be ecological dominants of terrestrial Californian habitat types. Our plant projections are compiled as decision support tools to help Conservancy project staff, as well as our external partners, develop the necessary plans, priorities and strategies to successfully adapt to uncertain changes in future climate. In the recently completed Southern Sierra Partnership's 2010 Climate-Adapted Conservation Plan for the Southern Sierra Nevada and Tehachapi Mountains, species and habitat forecasts shown here informed the development of a regional conservation design that explicitly incorporates long-term...
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The Nature Conservancy (TNC) has derived climate suitability forecasts for most species of trees and shrubs considered to be ecological dominants of terrestrial Californian habitat types. Our plant projections are compiled as decision support tools to help Conservancy project staff, as well as our external partners, develop the necessary plans, priorities and strategies to successfully adapt to uncertain changes in future climate. In the recently completed Southern Sierra Partnership's 2010 Climate-Adapted Conservation Plan for the Southern Sierra Nevada and Tehachapi Mountains, species and habitat forecasts shown here informed the development of a regional conservation design that explicitly incorporates long-term...
thumbnail
The Nature Conservancy (TNC) has derived climate suitability forecasts for most species of trees and shrubs considered to be ecological dominants of terrestrial Californian habitat types. Our plant projections are compiled as decision support tools to help Conservancy project staff, as well as our external partners, develop the necessary plans, priorities and strategies to successfully adapt to uncertain changes in future climate. In the recently completed Southern Sierra Partnership's 2010 Climate-Adapted Conservation Plan for the Southern Sierra Nevada and Tehachapi Mountains, species and habitat forecasts shown here informed the development of a regional conservation design that explicitly incorporates long-term...
thumbnail
The Nature Conservancy (TNC) has derived climate suitability forecasts for most species of trees and shrubs considered to be ecological dominants of terrestrial Californian habitat types. Our plant projections are compiled as decision support tools to help Conservancy project staff, as well as our external partners, develop the necessary plans, priorities and strategies to successfully adapt to uncertain changes in future climate. In the recently completed Southern Sierra Partnership's 2010 Climate-Adapted Conservation Plan for the Southern Sierra Nevada and Tehachapi Mountains, species and habitat forecasts shown here informed the development of a regional conservation design that explicitly incorporates long-term...
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