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Jim Kauahikaua

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Useful information on several different hydrologic regimes can be obtained using a combination of electrical geophysical surveys. Fresh-water lenses and laterally-confined aquifers can be located and mapped. However, more studies are required to evaluate the utility of geophysical methods for assessing perched aquifers.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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This data set includes gravity measurements for the Island of Hawai`i collected as the source data for "Deep magmatic structures of Hawaiian volcanoes, imaged by three-dimensional gravity models" (Kauahikaua, Hildenbrand, and Webring, 2000). Data for 3,611 observations are stored as a single table and disseminated in .CSV format. Each observation record includes values for field station ID, latitude and longitude (in both Old Hawaiian and WGS84 projections), elevation, and Observed Gravity value. See associated publication for reduction and interpretation of these data. Kauahikaua, J., Hildenbrand, T., and Webring, M., 2000, Deep magmatic structures of Hawaiian volcanoes, imaged by three-dimensional gravity models,...
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The Hawaiian Islands are the most geologically studied hot-spot islands in the world yet surprisingly, the only large-scale compilation of marine and land gravity data is more than 45 years old. Early surveys served as reconnaissance studies only, and detailed analyses of the crustal-density structure have been limited. Here we present a new chain-wide gravity compilation that incorporates historical island surveys, recently published work on the islands of Hawai‘i, Kaua‘i, and Ni‘ihau, and >122,000 km of newly compiled marine gravity data. Positive residual gravity anomalies reflect dense intrusive bodies, allowing us to locate current and former volcanic centers, major rift zones, and a previously suggested volcano...
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