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Joe S. Downey

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U.S. Air Force Launch Control Facility 0-0 is located about 3.6 miles (5.6 kilometres) north of Cooperstown, Griggs County, North Dakota. Test drilling indicates that a glacial-drift aquifer located within about 0.2 mile (0.3 kilometre) of the site will supply 2 to 3 gallons per minute (0.13 to 0.19 litre per second) of acceptable quality water for the facility.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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The objectives of the hydrologic investigation in Griggs and Steele Counties, N. Dak. (fig. 1) were to: (1) determine the location, extent, and nature of the major aquifers; (2) evaluate the occurrence and movement of ground water, including recharge and discharge; (3) estimate the quantities of water stored in the aquifers; (4) estimate the potential yields of wells tapping the major aquifers; and (5) determine the chemical quality of the ground water.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Bulletin
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Griggs and Steele Counties, in east-central North Dakota, are underlain by bedrock of Ordovician, Jurassic, and Cretaceous ages. The Fall River and Lakota Formations of Cretaceous age form the Dakota aquifer. The fractured upper part of the Pierre Formation (shale), also of Cretaceous age, forms another bedrock aquifer. The Dakota aquifer, which consists mainly of interbedded shale and sandstone units, may yield as much as 500 gallons per minute (32 liters per second) of sodium sulfate water to wells at selected locations. The Pierre aquifer yields from 1 to 10 gallons per minute (0.06 to 0.63 liters per second) of sodium bicarbonate or sodium sulfate water to wells. Four major glacial-drift aquifers are present...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Bulletin
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Three-dimensional (3-D) hydrogeologic modeling of the complex geology of the Death Valley region requires the application of a number of Geoscientific Information System (GSIS) techniques. This study, funded by United States Department of Energy as a part of the Yucca Mountain Project, focuses on an area of approximately 100,000 square kilometers (three degrees of latitude by three degrees of longitude) and extends up to ten kilometers in depth. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. GSIS techniques allow the synthesis of geologic, hydrologic and...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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