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Lucas B. Fortini

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Occupation of native ecosystems by invasive plant species alters their structure and/or function. In Hawaii, a subset of introduced plants is regarded as extremely harmful due to competitive ability, ecosystem modification, and biogeochemical habitat degradation. By controlling this subset of highly invasive ecosystem modifiers, conservation managers could significantly reduce native ecosystem degradation. To assess the invasibility of vulnerable native ecosystems, we selected a proxy subset of these invasive plants and developed robust ensemble species distribution models to define their respective potential distributions. The combinations of all species models using both binary and continuous habitat suitability...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: PLoS ONE
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Hawaiʻi, an archipelago of the most isolated inhabited islands on the planet, faces unique and extreme challenges to its biodiversity. We examined how the conservation community has responded to these challenges and how the responses have changed over time, using twenty years of abstracts from the Hawaiʻi Conservation Conference, a yearly gathering of the majority of scientists, managers and the public in Hawaiʻi. Of the 2145 abstracts considered, 60% percent reported research results; 40.0% reported information on conservation and resource management programmes and institutions (i.e., non-research abstracts). Initially, applied research abstracts predominated, but in recent years the number of basic research abstracts...
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Climate during the Early Cretaceous in tropical South America has often been reconstructed as arid. However, some areas seem to have been humid. We reconstructed the floristic composition of two tropical stratigraphic successions in Peru using quantitative palynology (rarefied species richness and abundance), and used the abundance of aridity vs. humidity indicator species to infer the predominant climate conditions of this region. The Berriasian to Hauterivian La Merced succession was dominated by fern spores and was predominantly humid. The Albian Aguas Frias succession yielded rich palynofloras, with 127 species, and also indicates predominantly humid conditions. These results support the hypothesis that the...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Palynology
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This layer depicts the status, or degree of disturbance, to plant communities on the main Hawaiian Islands. Several layers were uset to create this version (v 3.4). The original HabQual layer was developed by Jon Price and Jim Jacobi based on the mapped land cover units from the Hawaii GAP analysis program (Gon et al. 2006). This map was revised by combining data on land use and the “Bare” category from the NOAA C-CAP 2005 map (NOAA National Ocean Service Coastal Services Center 2012), and adding road corridors to the heavily disturbed category based on the Tiger Roads layer (United States Census Bureau 2014). Additionally, corrections were made to this version of the map by visually inspecting previously mapped...
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Hawaiian forest birds are imperiled, with fewer than half the original >40 species remaining extant. Recent studies document ongoing rapid population decline and pro- ject complete climate-based range losses for the critically endangered Kaua’i endemics ‘akeke’e (Loxops caeruleirostris) and ‘akikiki (Oreomystis bairdi) by end-of-century due to projected warming. Climate change facilitates the upward expansion of avian malaria into native high elevation forests where disease was historically absent. While intensi- fied conservation efforts attempt to safeguard these species and their habitats, the magnitude of potential loss and the urgency of this situation require all conservation options to be seriously considered....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Ecology and Evolution
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