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M.D. Woodside

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In 1991, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began to implement a full-scale National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. Long-term goals of the NAWQA program are to describe the status and trends in the quality of a large, representative part of the Nation's surface- and ground-water resources and to provide a sound, scientific understanding of the primary natural and human factors affecting the quality of these resources. In meeting these goals, the program will produce a wealth of water quality information that will be useful to policy makers and managers at the national, State, and local levels. Study-unit investigations constitute a major component of the NAWQA program, forming the principal building blocks...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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The 28,000-square-mile Albemarle-Pamlico drainage basin includes the Roanoke, Dan, Chowan Tar, and Neuse Rivers. The basin extends through four physiographic provinces in North Carolina and Virginia-Valley and Ridge, Blue Ridge, Piedmont and Coastal Plain. The spatial and temporal trends in ground-water and riverine water quality in the study area were characterized by using readily available data sources The primary data sources that were used included the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE) database, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Storage and Retrieval System (STORET) database, and results of a few investigations of pesticide occurrence. The principal...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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A 1990 nitrogen and phosphorus mass balance calculated for eight National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) basins in the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin indicated the importance of agricultural nonpoint sources of nitrogen and phosphorus and watershed nitrogen retention and processing capabilities. Basin total nitrogen and phosphorus input estimates were calculated for atmospheric deposition (which averaged 27 percent of total nitrogen inputs and 22 percent of total phosphorus inputs); crop fertilizer (27 and 25 percent); animal-waste (22 and 50 percent, respectively); point sources (3 percent each of total nitrogen and total phosphorus inputs); and biological nitrogen fixation (21 percent of total nitrogen...
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This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality-- Division of Intergovernmental Coordination to monitor and estimate loads of selected nutrients and suspended solids discharged to Chesapeake Bay from two major tributaries in Virginia. From July 1988 through June 1990, monitoring consisted of collecting depth-integrated, cross-sectional samples from the James and Rappahannock Rivers during storm- flow conditions and at scheduled intervals. Water- quality constituents that were monitored included total suspended solids (residue, total at 105 degrees Celsius), dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, dissolved ammonia, total Kjeldahl...
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Because nutrients can cause water-quaiity degradation, a major focus of NAWQA is to investigate effects of nutrients on surface- and ground-water quality. This report summarizes surface-water quality study design and land uses in the NAWQA Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin study unit, one of 60 study units nationwide, and shows how nutrient concentrations are related to land uses at selected basins in the study unit. The study area encompasses about 28,000 square miles (mi2) in central and eastern North Carolina and southern Virginia. The major river basins in the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin are the Chowan, Roanoke, Tar, and Neuse. The barrier islands, estuaries, and the AlbemarIe, Pamlico, and associated sounds...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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