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Geologic units of the Nectaris Basin rim have been interpreted as partly impact and partly volcanic in origin (refs. 29-4, 29-21, 29-35, 29-38, and 29-39). An exclusively volcanic origin was proposed for the material in the vicinity of the Apollo 16 landing site, slightly northwest of the Nectaris Basin (ref. 29-36). In view of the dominance of breccia and the paucity of volcanic material in the returned Apollo 16 samples, it now seems appropriate to reevaluate this part of the Moon to test whether the geology of the units mapped to date can be reconciled with an impact origin. Therefore, photogeologic analysis was attempted on a strip of Apollo 16 metric photographs; the superior quality and stereographic properties...
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Apollo 17 permission geologic studies of the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon revealed numerous small structures, in both mare and terra, having somewhat similar morphologies and variously resembling fault scarps, flow fronts, and mare ridges. Many of these features are too small to be identified on Lunar Orbiter IV photographs, which provided the most comprehensive, high-resolution coverage of this area before the later Apollo missions. The panoramic- and metric-camera photographs of Apollo 17 were taken at lower Sun angles than those of Apollo 15, which were used for the geologic mapping (refs. 31-40 and 31-41), and thus more clearly reveal fine details of texture and relief. In the illustrations of this part,...
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A large quantity of data on backscattered polarized and depolarized radar echoes from the Moon has been collected from Earth at 3.8-cm wavelength (ref. 33-23). Depolarized echoes are particularly interesting because theory indicates that relatively strong depolarized echoes can be caused by the following factors.
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Study of the sinuous Hadley Rille (fig. 25-45) was a primary goal of the Apollo 15 mission. Local geology of the rille near the landing site is described in section 5 of this report. Preliminary study of orbital photography from Hasselblad, metric, and panoramic cameras makes possible a description of some regional relationships of the rille. Considerable use is also made of a preliminary topographic map (10-m contour interval) of part of the rille (part C of this section). Contours in the mare area generalized from the map (fig. 25-35(a)) are shown in figure 25-46.
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Morphometry, the quantitative study of shape, complements the visual observation and photointerpretation in analyzing the most outstanding landforms of the Moon, its craters (refs. 32-1 and 32-2). All three of these interpretative tools, which were developed throughout the long history of telescopic lunar study preceding the Apollo Program, will continue to be applicable to crater analysis until detailed field work becomes possible. Although no large (>17.5 km diameter) craters were examined in situ on any of the Apollo landings, the photographs acquired from the command modules will markedly strengthen results of less direct investigations of the craters. For morphometry, the most useful materials are the orbital...
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