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National Wildlife Refuge System

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This dataset contains measures of seasonal mean bird stopover densities and in seasonal mean bird density based on weather surveillance radar data from 20 radar locations in the Northeast U.S. across seven autumn migrations (15 August through 7 November of 2008-2014) [six autumn migrations for the terminal doppler weather radar (15 August through 7 November of 2009-2014)]. Data are present only in radar-sampled areas for each individual radar (see below for description on how these data are filtered). If you are interested in a continuous map of bird stopover densities for the entire region (and outside of these radar coverage areas), refer to layer “Predicted autumn migratory landbird density, 1km, Northeast U.S.”.The...
Publication from the NALCC co-funded project Identifying Important Migratory Landbird Stopover Sites in the Northeast. With many of the world’s migratory bird populations in alarming decline, broad‐scale assessments of responses to migratory hazards may prove crucial to successful conservation efforts. Most birds migrate at night through increasingly light‐polluted skies. Bright light sources can attract airborne migrants and lead to collisions with structures, but might also influence selection of migratory stopover habitat and thereby acquisition of food resources. We demonstrate, using multi‐year weather radar measurements of nocturnal migrants across the northeastern U.S., that autumnal migrant stopover density...
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In FY12, hydrogeomorphic methodology was applied along 670 miles of the Missouri River from Decatur, Nebraska to St. Louis, Missouri. In FY15, additional resources extended the HGM up river to Gavin’s Point Dam, West Yankton, South Dakota (approximate river mile 811), the location of the most downstream mainstem dam; thus encompassing the entire free flowing reach of the Missouri River and increasing the study area by approximately 800,000 acres. Using this method, engineers and ecologists incorporated state-of-the-art scientific knowledge of ecological processes and key fish and wildlife species to identify options by which to emulate natural hydrologic and vegetation/ animal community dynamics. Results of this...
Publication from the NALCC co-funded project Identifying Important Migratory Landbird Stopover Sites in the Northeast.With many of the world’s migratory bird populations in alarming decline, broad‐scale assessments of responses to migratory hazards may prove crucial to successful conservation efforts. Most birds migrate at night through increasingly light‐polluted skies. Bright light sources can attract airborne migrants and lead to collisions with structures, but might also influence selection of migratory stopover habitat and thereby acquisition of food resources. We demonstrate, using multi‐year weather radar measurements of nocturnal migrants across the northeastern U.S., that autumnal migrant stopover density...
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In FY12, hydrogeomorphic methodology was being applied along 670 miles of the Missouri River from Decatur, Nebraska to St. Louis, Missouri. In FY15, additional resources extended the HGM up river to Gavin’s Point Dam, West Yankton, South Dakota (approximate river mile 811), the location of the most downstream mainstem dam; thus encompassing the entire free flowing reach of the Missouri River and increasing the study area by approximately 800,000 acres. Using this method, engineers and ecologists will incorporate state-of-the-art scientific knowledge of ecological processes and key fish and wildlife species to identify options by which to emulate natural hydrologic and vegetation/ animal community dynamics. Results...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, Conservation NGOs, All tags...
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