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North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative

The Klamath Basin in Oregon and California is home to a rich abundance of natural and cultural resources, many of which are vulnerable to present and future climate change. Climate change also threatens traditional ways of life for tribal communities, who have deep connections to the region. This project sought to increase the effectiveness of regional climate change adaptation and planning by (1) developing ways to integrate traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with western science in decision making, (2) building partnerships between tribal, academic, and government institutions, and (3) increasing future capacity to respond to climate change by engaging tribal youth. Through this project, the Quartz Valley...
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This dataset represents the soil texture from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of western Oregon that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative. Soil texture is the mineral particle size distribution of soil particles within a soil horizon. This dataset also documents rock fragments and organic matter that may contribute to water infiltration, storage and relocation within the surface horizons of the soil profile. For reference, see NRCS soil texture triangle: http://soils.usda.gov/technical/aids/investigations/texture/
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This dataset represents the soil order from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of southern Alaska (b) that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative.
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This dataset represents the soil pH from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of northern California that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative.
Abstract: As the climate changes, human land use may impede species from tracking areas with suitable climates. Maintaining connectivity between areas of different temperatures could allow organisms to move along temperature gradients and allow species to continue to occupy the same temperature space as the climate warms. We used a coarse-filter approach to identify broad corridors for movement between areas where human influence is low while simultaneously routing the corridors along present-day spatial gradients of temperature. We modified a cost–distance algorithm to model these corridors and tested the model with data on current land-use and climate patterns in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The...
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