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USGS - science for a changing world

Peter N Schweitzer

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This cover contains the outlines of recent landslides formed prior to Hurricane Mitch in October - November 1998. Jeffrey Coe and Robert Bucknam mapped the landslides. Most landslides were mapped using 1:40,000-scale aerial photographs and a Kern PG-2 photogrammetric plotter at 4X and 8X magnifications. The photographs were scaled and oriented to the topographic base map using prominent topographic landmarks and plotted on a transparent polyester overlay registered to the topographic base maps at scales of 1:50,000 or 1:25,000. In areas where landslides were very sparse, the aerial photographs were scanned with a mirror stereoscope at 4X magnification, and landslide locations were transferred to base maps by inspection....
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This is a report of geochemical data from various media collected on Isle Royale, a large island in northeastern Lake Superior. Isle Royale became a national park in 1940 and was designated as a wilderness area in 1976.USGS sampling began in 1996 as part of a larger project on the Midcontinent Rift in the Lake Superior region. Data are given in nine Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. All the data are newly acquired by the USGS.
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This is a point coverage that contains data for coal and otherstratigraphic horizons in the John Henry Member of the StraightCliffs Formation (Upper Cretaceous) east of 112 degrees oflongitude in the Kaiparowits Plateau. The item map# is the numberon the index map (Figure A, Plate 1) that refers to a record in adata table (Appendix 1) in Hettinger and others (1996). Bufferswere drawn at a three-mile distance from data points in thiscoverage to create the reliability coverage. This coverage alsoincludes arcs representing lines of cross section shown in Figs. B,C, D and E, Plate 1 (Hettinger and others, 1996).
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The paper version of the Geologic Map of the eastern part of the Challis National Forest and vicinity, Idaho was compiled by Anna Wilson and Betty Skipp in 1994. The geology was compiled on a 1:250,000 scale topographic base map. TechniGraphic System, Inc. of Fort Collins Colorado digitized this map under contract for N.Shock. G.Green edited and prepared the digital version for publication as a GIS database. The digital geologic map database can be queried in many ways to produce a variety of geologic maps.
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During the Pliocene to middle Pleistocene, pluvial lakes in the western Great Basin repeatedly rose to levels much higher than those of the well-documented late Pleistocene pluvial lakes, and some presently isolated basins were connected. Sedimentologic, geomorphic, and chronologic evidence at sites shown on the map indicates that Lakes Lahontan and Columbus-Rennie were as much as 70 m higher in the early-middle Pleistocene than during their late Pleistocene high stands. Lake Lahontan at its 1400-m shoreline level would submerge present-day Reno, Carson City, and Battle Mountain, and would flood other now-dry basins. To the east, Lakes Jonathan (new name), Diamond, Newark, and Hubbs also reached high stands during...
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