Skip to main content

Philip Boyd

thumbnail
These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive and problematic plant stressor for riparian areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose. Counties with a small number of participants were not adjusted for small sample size. These results were...
thumbnail
These heatmaps show a top 3 riparian ecosystem functionality stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose. Counties with a small number of participants were not adjusted for small sample size. These results were shared via a webinar hosted by the Desert...
thumbnail
These heatmaps were created from responses to an ecosystem stressors ranking exercise from 157 conservation professionals working in the Chihuahuan Desert. The ranking exercise was created by the Borderlands Research Institute at Sul Ross State University, in Alpine, Texas. The exercise was sent to conservation partners within the Chihuahuan Desert region in the winter of 2018 and 2019. Participants were asked to identify counties in the US and municipalities in Mexico where they focus their conservation work. Participants were asked to rank the top 3 stressors facing 4 categories in 3 priority ecosystems.Priority Ecosystems:1. Grassland/Desertscrub Ecosystems 2. Riparian/Aquatic Ecosystems3. Montane Woodlands EcosystemsWithin...
thumbnail
These heatmaps show a top 3 grassland ecosystem functionality stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose. Counties with a small number of participants were not adjusted for small sample size. These results were shared via a webinar hosted by the Desert...
thumbnail
These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive animal stressor for riparian areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose. Counties with a small number of participants were not adjusted for small sample size. These results were shared via a...
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.