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Regional Offices

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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed and implemented an algorithm that identifies burned areas in dense time series of Landsat image stacks to produce the Landsat Burned Area Essential Climate Variable (BAECV) products. The algorithm makes use of predictors derived from individual Landsat scenes, lagged reference conditions, and change metrics between the scene and reference conditions. Outputs of the BAECV algorithm consist of pixel-level burn probabilities for each Landsat scene, and annual burn probability, burn classification, and burn date composites. These products were generated for the conterminous United States for 1984 through 2015. These data are also available for download at https://rmgsc.cr.usgs.gov/outgoing/baecv/BAECV_CONUS_v1.1_2017/...
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This dataset documents results from 1,041 groundwater samples collected during 1986‒2015 from 16 geologic units in Pennsylvania associated with 25 or more groundwater samples with activities or concentrations of radon-222. Radon-222 is hereafter referred to as “radon.” These 16 geologic units were evaluated in an effort to identify variations in radon concentrations and to classify potential radon exposure from groundwater and indoor air. This dataset was developed for the Pennsylvania Environmental Public Health Tracking (PAEPHT) Program to describe the spatial distribution of radon concentrations in groundwater in Pennsylvania and to illustrate data gaps that exist throughout the State. The PAEPHT Program is part...
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Coastal communities are uniquely vulnerable to sea-level rise (SLR) and severe storms such as hurricanes. These events enhance the dispersion and concentration of natural and anthropogenic chemicals and pathogenic microorganisms that could adversely affect the health and resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems in coming years. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed the Sediment-Bound Contaminant Resiliency and Response (SCoRR) strategy to define baseline and post-event sediment-bound environmental health (EH) stressors. These data document the location, sampling techniques and field conditions observed while collecting soil and sediment samples from selected stations in the northeastern US during the...
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Coastal communities are uniquely vulnerable to sea-level rise (SLR) and severe storms such as hurricanes. These events enhance the dispersion and concentration of natural and anthropogenic chemicals and pathogenic microorganisms that could adversely affect the health and resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems in coming years. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed the Sediment-Bound Contaminant Resiliency and Response (SCoRR) strategy to define baseline and post-event sediment-bound environmental health (EH) stressors. These data document the location, sampling techniques and field conditions observed while collecting soil and sediment samples from selected stations in the northeastern US during the...
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This digital dataset represents the three-dimensional hydrogeologic framework for the Rio Grande Transboundary region of New Mexico, Texas, USA, and Northern Chihuahua, Mexico. The data define the elevation, thickness, extent, and character of the principal hydrostratigraphic units of the region, and faults and igneous intrusive dikes that cut these units. The digital data describe the following five hydrostratigraphic units: RC, river channel alluvium; three informal subdivisions of the Santa Fe Group (USF, Upper Santa Fe Group; MSF, Middle Santa Fe Group; LSF, Lower Santa Fe Group); and BSMT, which includes all pre-Santa Fe Group rocks (basement). All units except BSMT (RC, USF, MSF, LSF) are split into two subunits....
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