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Robert A. Ayuso

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White micas from hydrothermally altered and mineralized zones in the Catheart Mountain Cu-Mo porphyry deposit have regular compositional variations that are generally related to the contents of copper, total iron, and sulfur in the whole rock. Micas in unmineralized rocks exhibit no such relationship. White mica compositions reflect primarily the control imposed by the celadonitic substitution AIIV +Aiv1 =Si+ (Fe, Mg). The variation in white mica composition in the Catheart Mountain porphyry may be explained by superposition and overprinting of mineral assemblages by ore fluids during mineralization and during the waning stages of hydrothermal alteration. Local bulk compositional differences, changing PHao and fluid...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Bulletin
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Geochemistry maps showing the distribution and abundance of 18 elements in about 1,400 rock samples, both mineralized and unmineralized, from the southern Toquima Range, Nev., indicate major structural and lithologic controls on mineralization, and suggest sources of the elements. Radiometric age data, lead mineralogy and paragenesis data, and lead-isotope data supplement the geochemical and geologic data, providing further insight into timing, sources, and controls on mineralization. Major zones of mineralization are centered on structural margins of calderas and principal northwest-striking fault zones, as at Round Mountain, Manhattan, and Jefferson mining districts, and on intersections of low-angle and steep...
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Volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits on Prince of Wales Island and vicinity in southeastern Alaska are associated with Late Proterozoic through Cambrian volcanosedimentary rocks of the Wales Group and with Ordovician through Early Silurian felsic volcanic rocks of the Moira Sound unit (new informal name). The massive sulfide deposits in the Wales Group include the Big Harbor, Copper City, Corbin, Keete Inlet, Khayyam, Ruby Tuesday, and Stumble-On deposits, and those in the Moira Sound unit include the Barrier Islands, Moira Copper, Niblack, and Nichols Bay deposits. Pb-isotopic signatures were determined on sulfide minerals (galena, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and sphalerite) to constrain metal sources...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Professional Paper
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The youngest part of the Farewell terrane in interior Alaska (USA) is the enigmatic Devonian–Cretaceous Mystic subterrane. New U-Pb detrital zircon, fossil, geochemical, neodymium isotopic, and petrographic data illuminate the origin of the rocks of this subterrane. The Devonian–Permian Sheep Creek Formation yielded youngest detrital zircons of Devonian age, major detrital zircon age probability peaks between ca. 460 and 405 Ma, and overall age spectra like those from the underlying Dillinger subterrane. Samples are sandstones rich in sedimentary lithic clasts, and differ from approximately coeval strata to the east that have abundant volcanic lithic clasts and late Paleozoic detrital zircons. The Permian Mount...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Geosphere
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Rare earth element (REE) ion-adsorption clay deposits are of global economic importance because they currently supply a significant portion of the world’s annual production of both light (LREE) and heavy REE (HREE). There is considerable ambiguity regarding the origin of this deposit type: The main criteria include the presence of large, generally granitic, igneous suites; long periods of intense weathering with little subsequent erosion; and evidence for mobility of REE within the regolith. Granitic rocks of the southeastern United States have been subjected to a long history of chemical weathering, comparable to that of South China, an area which contains many REE clay deposits. Detailed comparisons of weathered...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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