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S. James Taggart

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Sea otter (Enhydra lutris) populations are increasing and expanding into areas of Southeast Alaska where Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) are commercially harvested. Although sea otters are known to feed on Dungeness crabs, their effects upon crab demography have not been quantified. We censused Dungeness crabs in adjacent areas within Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve with and without sea otters in April 1993, 1994, and 1995 to investigate the effects of sea otter predation. Two different crab survey techniques were used. Commercial crab pots with sealed escape rings and baited similarly were soaked for 24 hours to measure CPUE in 0-25 m depths. A minimum of 50 pots was used for each site; 25 additional pots...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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Most examples of positive population responses to marine protected areas (MPAs) have been documented for tropical reef species with very small home ranges; the utility of MPAs for commercially harvested temperate species that have large movement patterns remains poorly tested. We measured the distribution and abundance of red king Paralithodes camtschaticus and Tanner Chionoecetes bairdi crabs inside and outside of MPAs in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska, USA. By tagging a sub-sample of crabs with sonic tags, we estimated the movement of adult crabs from one of the MPAs (Muir Inlet) into the central portion of Glacier Bay where fishing still occurs. Tanner crabs and red king crabs moved similar average distances...
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Stomach contents were collected from sport-caught halibut in Glacier Bay National Park. Stomach samples containing a combination of fish and invertebrate species were observed less frequently than expected. Small, subtidal, noncommercial crab and cod-like fish (Gadidae) appear to be the most important prey items. In thc dict of Pacific halibut. Preliminary findings suggested that dict changes dramatically with age. The frequency of occurrence of crustaceans and small forage fishes declines with an increase in age while the frequency of occurrence of cod-like fish (Gadidae) and sculpins (Cottidae) increases with an increase in age. In addition, there were few halibut that contained prey items from different taxa...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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A systematic pot survey in Glacier Bay, Alaska, was conducted to characterize the spatial distribution of juvenile and adult female Tanner crabs, and their association with depth and temperature. The information was used to infer important recruitment processes for Tanner crabs in glaciated ecosystems. High-catch areas for juvenile and adult female Tanner crabs were identified using local autocorrelation statistics. Spatial segregation by size class corresponded to features in the glacial landscape: high-catch areas for juveniles were located at the distal ends of two narrow glacial fjords, and high-catch areas for adults were located in the open waters of the central Bay. Juvenile female Tanner crabs were found...
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Patterns of micro- to mesoscale distribution of Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) in nearshore habitats at five locations in and near Glacier Bay National Park were revealed using subtidal transects. Sampling was conducted in April and September 1992 and 1993 and April 1994. Divers censused crabs by sex and reproductive status (ovigerous/nonovigerous females) along belt transects (2 m x 100 m) perpendicular to shore in the depth range 0 m (mean lower low water) to 18 m. A sample estimator of Morisita's index (Î*Δ) was used to quantify crab dispersion at 10 scales of measurement ranging from 20 m2 to 200 m2 at each location during each sampling period.Values of Î*Δ in ovigerous female C. magister deviated significantly...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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