Skip to main content

S.Y. Johnson

thumbnail
This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in "Folds_OffshoreMonterey.zip," which is accessible from http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ofr20161110. The shelf north and east of the Monterey Bay Peninsula in the Offshore of Monterey map area is cut by a diffuse zone of northwest striking, steeply dipping to vertical faults comprising the Monterey Bay Fault Zone (MBFZ). This zone, originally mapped by Greene (1977, 1990), extends about 45 km across Monterey Bay (Map E on sheet 9). Fault strands within the MBFZ are mapped with high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles (sheet 8). Seismic-reflection profiles...
thumbnail
This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Offshore Monterey, California. The vector data file is included in "Paleoshorelines_OffshoreMonterey.zip," which is accessible from http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ofr20161110. Sea level has risen about 125 to 130 m over about the last 21,000 years (for example, Stanford and others, 2011), leading to broadening of the continental shelf, progressive eastward migration of the shoreline, and associated transgressive erosion and deposition. Sea-level rise was apparently not steady, leading to development of a submerged shoreline along the flank of Carmel Canyon (water depths of 80 to 90 m) during a relative stillstand. Paleoshorelines...
thumbnail
More than 10,000 km2 of high-resolution, public-domain topography acquired by the Puget Sound Lidar Consortium is revolutionizing investigations of active faulting, continental glaciation, landslides, and surficial processes in the seismically active Puget Lowland. The Lowland-the population and economic center of the Pacific Northwest-presents special problems for hazards investigations, with its young glacial topography, dense forest cover, and urbanization. Lidar mapping during leaf-off conditions has led to a detailed digital model of the landscape beneath the forest canopy. The surface thus revealed contains a rich and diverse record of previously unknown surface-rupturing faults, deep-seated landslides, uplifted...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: GSA Today
thumbnail
A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the Puget Lowland shows details of the Seattle fault zone, an active but largely concealed east-trending zone of reverse faulting at the southern margin of the Seattle basin. Three elongate, east-trending magnetic anomalies are associated with north-dipping Tertiary strata exposed in the hanging wall; the magnetic anomalies indicate where these strata continue beneath glacial deposits. The northernmost anomaly, a narrow, elongate magnetic high, precisely correlates with magnetic Miocene volcanic conglomerate. The middle anomaly, a broad magnetic low, correlates with thick, nonmagnetic Eocene and Oligocene marine and fluvial strata. The southern anomaly, a broad, complex magnetic...
thumbnail
The Lower Permian Schoolhouse Member of the Maroon Formation forms a partly exhumed petroleum reservoir in the Eagle basin of northwestern Colorado. The Schoolhouse consists mainly of yellowish gray to gray, low-angle to parallel bedded, very fine to fine-grained sandstone of eolian sand-sheet origin; interbedded fluvial deposits are present in most sections. Geological and geochemical data suggest that Schoolhouse Member oils have upper Paleozoic sources, including the intrabasinal Belden Formation. Late Paleozoic faults have served as local conduits for vertical petroleum migration. Large-scale (>200 km) lateral migration from sources in the Permian Phosphoria Formation is also possible but less likely. Belden...
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.