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These data were collected as part of a field trial to test the effectiveness of a sylvatic plague vaccine (see Rocke et al., 2017 for details). Vaccine and control plots were selected randomly from the available pairs at each location. Baits containing Rhodamine B, a biomarker, were distributed at each plot. At least 1 week and no more than 2 months post-baiting each year, local collaborators captured, marked, and sampled prairie dogs. Hair and whisker samples were collected from up to 50 unique prairie dogs from each plot each year. Sex, age, weight, and the identity of all current-year and prior-year recaptures were recorded for each captured animal. In the laboratory, hair/whiskers were assessed for the presence...
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This inventory was originally created by the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, El Salvador (2001) describing the landslides triggered by the M 7.7 San Miguel, El Salvador earthquake that occurred on 13 January 2001 at 17:33:32 UTC. Care should be taken when comparing with other inventories because different authors use different mapping techniques. This inventory also could be associated with other earthquakes such as aftershocks or triggered events. Please check the author methods summary and the original data source for more information on these details and to confirm the viability of this inventory for your specific use. With the exception of the data from USGS sources, the inventory data and...
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This inventory was originally created by Xu and others (2014) describing the landslides triggered by the M 5.9 Gansu, China earthquake, also known as the Minxian - Zhangxian earthquake, that occurred on 21 July 2013 at 23:45:56 UTC. Care should be taken when comparing with other inventories because different authors use different mapping techniques. This inventory also could be associated with other earthquakes such as aftershocks or triggered events. Please check the author methods summary and the original data source for more information on these details and to confirm the viability of this inventory for your specific use. With the exception of the data from USGS sources, the inventory data and associated metadata...
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This USGS Data Release represents the data used to develop multiple linear regression models for estimating the loads of total nitrogen in small streams. Recursive partitioning and random forest regression were used to assess 85 geospatial, environmental, and watershed variables across 636 small (less than 585 square kilometers) watersheds to determine which variables are fundamentally important to the estimation of annual loads of total nitrogen. These data support the following publication: Kronholm, S.C., Capel, P.D., and Terziotti, Silvia, 2016, Statistically extracted fundamental watershed variables for estimating the loads of total nitrogen in small streams: Environmental Modeling and Assessment, 10 p., http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10666-016-9525-3.
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This inventory was originally created by Gorum and others (2014) describing the landslides triggered by a sequence of earthquakes, with the largest being the M 6.2 17 km N of Puerto Aisen, Chile earthquake that occurred on 21 April 2007 at 23:45:56 UTC. Care should be taken when comparing with other inventories because different authors use different mapping techniques. This inventory includes landslides triggered by a sequence of earthquakes rather than a single mainshock. Please check the author methods summary and the original data source for more information on these details and to confirm the viability of this inventory for your specific use. With the exception of the data from USGS sources, the inventory...
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ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.