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These data were collected as part of a field trial to test the effectiveness of a sylvatic plague vaccine (see Rocke et al., 2017 for details). Vaccine and control plots were selected randomly from the available pairs at each location. Baits containing Rhodamine B, a biomarker, were distributed at each plot. At least 1 week and no more than 2 months post-baiting each year, local collaborators captured, marked, and sampled prairie dogs. Hair and whisker samples were collected from up to 50 unique prairie dogs from each plot each year. Sex, age, weight, and the identity of all current-year and prior-year recaptures were recorded for each captured animal. In the laboratory, hair/whiskers were assessed for the presence...
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This USGS Data Release represents the data used to develop multiple linear regression models for estimating the loads of total nitrogen in small streams. Recursive partitioning and random forest regression were used to assess 85 geospatial, environmental, and watershed variables across 636 small (less than 585 square kilometers) watersheds to determine which variables are fundamentally important to the estimation of annual loads of total nitrogen. These data support the following publication: Kronholm, S.C., Capel, P.D., and Terziotti, Silvia, 2016, Statistically extracted fundamental watershed variables for estimating the loads of total nitrogen in small streams: Environmental Modeling and Assessment, 10 p., http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10666-016-9525-3.
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Boiling River at Mammoth (YBOI), Yellowstone National Park Sample Collection: Samples were collected near the USGS stream gage 06190540 (Latitude 44°59'05.83", Longitude 110°41'18.20" NAD83). At the time of collection, all waters samples were filtered through a syringe filter (0.45-micrometer). Two splits of the filtered water were retained for chemical analyses, including an unacidified (FU) sample for determination of anion concentrations and a nitric acid preserved (FA; 1% volume-to-volume concentrated trace-metal grade nitric acid) sample for cation and trace metal analyses. During sample collection, the water temperature, specific conductance, and pH were often measured. Sample Analyses: Concentrations...
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Falls River near Squirrel, Idaho (YFAL) Sample Collection: Samples were collected near the USGS stream gage 13046995 (Latitude 44°03'43", Longitude 111°09'07" NAD83). At the time of collection, all waters samples were filtered through a syringe filter (0.45-micrometer). Two splits of the filtered water were retained for chemical analyses, including an unacidified (FU) sample for determination of anion concentrations and a nitric acid preserved (FA; 1% volume-to-volume concentrated trace-metal grade nitric acid) sample for cation and trace metal analyses. During sample collection, the water temperature, specific conductance, and pH were often measured. Sample Analyses: Concentrations of chloride, fluoride,...
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Following an explosion at the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig on April 20, 2010, MC252 an estimated 3.19 million barrels of oil leaked into the Northern Gulf of Mexico over 87 days. The endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii [Lk]) has a long established record of using the area near the well as primary foraging grounds. Resulting short- and long-term negative impacts of the oil spill on sea turtles could induce changes in the health and fitness of the Lk population. MC252 oil is known to have entered the foraging areas. Consequently, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures from MC252 oil should be reflected in the food web and in the tissues of organisms such as sea turtles. We measured carbon...
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