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Scott E. Boyce

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The Central Valley, and particularly the San Joaquin Valley, has a long history of land subsidence caused by groundwater development. The extensive withdrawal of groundwater from the unconsolidated deposits of the San Joaquin Valley lowered groundwater levels and caused widespread land subsidence—reaching 9 meters by 1981. More than half of the thickness of the aquifer system is composed of fine-grained sediments, including clays, silts, and sandy or silty clays that are susceptible to compaction. In an effort to aid water managers in understanding how water moves through the aquifer system, predicting water-supply scenarios, and addressing issues related to water competition, the United States Geological Survey...
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The Central Valley, and particularly the San Joaquin Valley, has a long history of land subsidence caused by groundwater development. The extensive withdrawal of groundwater from the unconsolidated deposits of the San Joaquin Valley lowered groundwater levels and caused widespread land subsidence—reaching 9 meters by 1981. More than half of the thickness of the aquifer system is composed of fine-grained sediments, including clays, silts, and sandy or silty clays that are susceptible to compaction. In an effort to aid water managers in understanding how water moves through the aquifer system, predicting water-supply scenarios, and addressing issues related to water competition, the United States Geological Survey...
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The Central Valley, and particularly the San Joaquin Valley, has a long history of land subsidence caused by groundwater development. The extensive withdrawal of groundwater from the unconsolidated deposits of the San Joaquin Valley lowered groundwater levels and caused widespread land subsidence—reaching 9 meters by 1981. More than half of the thickness of the aquifer system is composed of fine-grained sediments, including clays, silts, and sandy or silty clays that are susceptible to compaction. In an effort to aid water managers in understanding how water moves through the aquifer system, predicting water-supply scenarios, and addressing issues related to water competition, the United States Geological Survey...
thumbnail
The Central Valley, and particularly the San Joaquin Valley, has a long history of land subsidence caused by groundwater development. The extensive withdrawal of groundwater from the unconsolidated deposits of the San Joaquin Valley lowered groundwater levels and caused widespread land subsidence—reaching 9 meters by 1981. More than half of the thickness of the aquifer system is composed of fine-grained sediments, including clays, silts, and sandy or silty clays that are susceptible to compaction. In an effort to aid water managers in understanding how water moves through the aquifer system, predicting water-supply scenarios, and addressing issues related to water competition, the United States Geological Survey...
thumbnail
The Central Valley, and particularly the San Joaquin Valley, has a long history of land subsidence caused by groundwater development. The extensive withdrawal of groundwater from the unconsolidated deposits of the San Joaquin Valley lowered groundwater levels and caused widespread land subsidence—reaching 9 meters by 1981. More than half of the thickness of the aquifer system is composed of fine-grained sediments, including clays, silts, and sandy or silty clays that are susceptible to compaction. In an effort to aid water managers in understanding how water moves through the aquifer system, predicting water-supply scenarios, and addressing issues related to water competition, the United States Geological Survey...
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