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Serink, Andrea

Atlin Lake in northern British Columbia and southern Yukon Territory is the largest natural lake in the North American Cordillera (791 km super(2)). Inflow from the Juneau Ice Field delivers large volumes of sediment to the proximal basins of Willison Bay and Llewellyn Inlet. Sediment is distributed by interflow and underflow through these basins. Based on acoustic data, each of these basins contain Holocene deposits about 120 m thick, representing mean annual accumulation since deglaciation of more than 1 cm/a. Cores confirm this, except that the formation of a small lake at the toe of Llewellyn Glacier during about the past 50 years is trapping sediment and has reduced accumulation in Llewellyn Inlet by an order...
Atlin Lake in northern British Columbia and southern Yukon Territory is the largest natural lake in the North American Cordillera (791 km super(2)). Inflow from the Juneau Ice Field delivers large volumes of sediment to the proximal basins of Willison Bay and Llewellyn Inlet. Sediment is distributed by interflow and underflow through these basins. Based on acoustic data, each of these basins contain Holocene deposits about 120 m thick, representing mean annual accumulation since deglaciation of more than 1 cm/a. Cores confirm this, except that the formation of a small lake at the toe of Llewellyn Glacier during about the past 50 years is trapping sediment and has reduced accumulation in Llewellyn Inlet by an order...
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Atlin Lake in northern British Columbia and southern Yukon Territory is the largest natural lake in the North American Cordillera (791 km super(2)). Inflow from the Juneau Ice Field delivers large volumes of sediment to the proximal basins of Willison Bay and Llewellyn Inlet. Sediment is distributed by interflow and underflow through these basins. Based on acoustic data, each of these basins contain Holocene deposits about 120 m thick, representing mean annual accumulation since deglaciation of more than 1 cm/a. Cores confirm this, except that the formation of a small lake at the toe of Llewellyn Glacier during about the past 50 years is trapping sediment and has reduced accumulation in Llewellyn Inlet by an order...
Atlin Lake in northern British Columbia and southern Yukon Territory is the largest natural lake in the North American Cordillera (791 km super(2)). Inflow from the Juneau Ice Field delivers large volumes of sediment to the proximal basins of Willison Bay and Llewellyn Inlet. Sediment is distributed by interflow and underflow through these basins. Based on acoustic data, each of these basins contain Holocene deposits about 120 m thick, representing mean annual accumulation since deglaciation of more than 1 cm/a. Cores confirm this, except that the formation of a small lake at the toe of Llewellyn Glacier during about the past 50 years is trapping sediment and has reduced accumulation in Llewellyn Inlet by an order...
Atlin Lake in northern British Columbia and southern Yukon Territory is the largest natural lake in the North American Cordillera (791 km super(2)). Inflow from the Juneau Ice Field delivers large volumes of sediment to the proximal basins of Willison Bay and Llewellyn Inlet. Sediment is distributed by interflow and underflow through these basins. Based on acoustic data, each of these basins contain Holocene deposits about 120 m thick, representing mean annual accumulation since deglaciation of more than 1 cm/a. Cores confirm this, except that the formation of a small lake at the toe of Llewellyn Glacier during about the past 50 years is trapping sediment and has reduced accumulation in Llewellyn Inlet by an order...
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