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Sonya A. Jones

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Increasing demand and competition for limited regional water resources make it difficult to ensure adequate water availability for both human and ecological needs now and into the future. Recognizing the need to improve the tools and information that are available to effectively evaluate water-resource availability, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) identified a National Water Census (NWC) as one of its six core science directions for the decade 2007–17. In 2009, the SECURE Water Act (Public Law 111–11) authorized the USGS to develop a national water availability and use assessment program that would update the most recent national assessment of the status of water resources in the United States as well as develop...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Fact Sheet
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The Southeastern United States spans a broad range of physiographic settings and maintains exceptionally high levels of faunal diversity. Unfortunately, many of these ecosystems are increasingly under threat due to rapid human development, and management agencies are increasingly aware of the potential effects that climate change will have on these ecosystems. Natural resource managers and conservation planners can be effective at preserving ecosystems in the face of these stressors only if they can adapt current conservation efforts to increase the overall resilience of the system. Climate change, in particular, challenges many of the basic assumptions used by conservation planners and managers. Previous conservation...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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The Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009 (Public Law 111—11) was passed into law on March 30, 2009. Subtitle F, also known as the SECURE Water Act, calls for the establishment of a “national water availability and use assessment program” within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS issued the first report on the program in 2013. Program progress over the period 2013–17 is reported herein to fulfill the requirement to inform Congress on implementation of the national water availability and use assessment program, also referred to as the USGS National Water Census (the Water Census).Much work has been accomplished during 2013–17 on producing water budgets for the nation, a goal USGS outlined in its first...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Circular
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Three permeable zones with varying lithology and water chemistry compose the Trinity aquifer, a principal source of water in the 5,500- square-mile study area in south-central Texas. The upper permeable zone locally yields small quantities of water to wells and was not included in this study. The middle permeable zone primarily is composed of limestone with minor amounts of dolostone. Terrigenous sand and marine limestone, with minor amounts of dolostone, are the principal lithologic units in the lower permeable zone. Dissolved solids concentrations range from 329 to 1,820 milligrams per liter in water samples from the middle permeable zone and from 518 to 3,030 milligrams per liter in water samples from the lower...
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Ground water in the shallow alluvial aquifer is contaminated at the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas. Five production wells at the site are cased through the alluvial aquifer and underlying units and are screened in either the Paluxy or Twin Mountains aquifers. Three abandoned wells, originally completed in the Twin Mountains aquifer but filled with drilling mud in 1958, also penetrate the alluvial aquifer. The Paluxy and Twin Mountains aquifers are used for drinking-water supplies in and around the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. Trichloroethylene and its degradation products, dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride, and the metal chromium previously have been detected in the shallow alluvial aquifer....
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